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Fixed-limit also called just Limit is a type of betting structure for a poker game where the amount of all bets and raises in any given betting round is fixed. This is in contrast to pot-limit and no-limit betting. Most commonly, fixed-limit games have two bet sizescalled the small bet and the big bet. Such games are usually written as having limits of "small-slash-big". In Hold 'em and Omaha games, the big bet is usually twice the size of the small bet, though in other variants such as 7-Studit may be more.

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The course designer can consider the variables and decide which combination is suitable for creating a preparatory teaching course in a given situation see Figure 8. In such a case the long list of the discriminators in the advanced, scenario based search mode can be considered.

This language has good built in possibilities for generating web pages as well as sending emails. The database has separate tables for: i authors' contact details, ii transitional course descriptions, and iii file attachments. A view was used to realize confidentiality if no explicit permission for public viewing was given. Results and discussionAt the moment of writing this paper the S. More specifically, 45 of them originate from the Netherlands, 16 from Poland, 15 from Lithuania, 10 from Belgium, 5 from Israel and 4 from Spain.

The general purpose of 28 of the courses is to fill the knowledge gaps of the participant, 6 courses are there only to revive the previously learned concepts, 66 courses have the ambition to do both, while 19 courses in the database have the aim to address some other transitional problem and are not focused in filling knowledge gaps.

Most preparatory courses use ICT for communication with students 79 and for storage and distribution of materials by the teaching staff The latest statistics about the courses in the database are displayed automatically on the welcome page of the S. One of the main worries through the process of filling in the form was that having to fill it in in English might be a problem for some of the people who would like to offer a description of their own preparatory course.

However, in order to be able to do the research it was crucial for us to receive enough responses. For solving this problem, we provided the form and the call for participation in eight different European languages: English, French, German, Greek, Italian, Lithuanian, Polish and Spanish. The search options and the records found are only in English. When a course is filled in in a different language than English, the process of translation of multiple choice and multiple answer questions proceeds automatically while the open questions need to be translated manually.

During the project S. After the end of this project, the database will still provide the option to be filled in by choosing among multiple languages. However, there will be no possibility to translate the open questions; therefore they will not be displayed in English.

The choice is left to the person contributing a course to decide whether the course should be available in their own language thus making it accessible only to people who speak that language or in English aiming at sharing the contribution with the whole European community and the whole world. Wieland, A. TvHO Tijdschrift voor hoger onderwijs , 1, IntroductionIn this empirical study, we investigate the revealed preferences for using the e-learning component in a blended learning environment for learning introductory statistics in a large group of first year university students following an economics or business program.

This blended learning environment consists of tutorials based on the problem-based learning principle, lectures, independent learning and an electronic learning environment based upon knowledge space theory: ALEKS Tempelaar, Rienties, Rehm, Dijkstra, Arts et al.

Except for the tutorial sessions, for which attendance is required, students can set the intensity for each of the components of the blended learning environment according their personal preferences. Some of these preferences become revealed, e. This study aims to explain patterns in these revealed preferences by individual differences in learning styles or approaches to studying, subject attitudes, achievement motivations, self-theories on intelligence and dispositions toward empathy and systemizing.

Not much research has been directed to the role of student learning approaches, the existence of variability over students, and its relationship to the use of e-learning tools in a blended learning environment. A recent special issue on learning styles and e-learning environments, see Cools, Evans andRedmond andVigentini , reports on an empirical study investigating the relationships between learning approaches, intensity of e-learning, and academic performances, and finds weak evidence for the existence of such relationships.

However, in the Vigentini study, the use of e-learning is operationalized by the number of clicks in the learning environment, which might be different from learning time, the prime focus of our study. In the area of statistics education, some studies focus on the design of courses using blended learning to accommodate individual differences in learning. For example, Utts provides an overview of several instruments available to measure student learning styles, and some empirical outcomes of the application of these instruments.

Main theme of her contribution is the mismatch that more often than not exists between learning styles of students and preferred styles of lecturers. To avoid such mismatch, Pearl proposes a buffet system in which students are assessed on their learning styles, and subsequently are matched to an educational setting that best accommodates individual student preferences. In such a setting, accounting for student variability takes place when the student is assigned to one unique educational setting; after this assignment, the instructional format is fixed.

The ALEKS module College Algebra is the kernel of a preparatory summer course that is offered by the authors of this article from on. This summer course is a typical example of what Brants and Struyven describe as the European perspective on developmental education: its prime aim is to address transitional problems that are the effect of differences among national secondary educational programmes in Europe.

The summer course is offered in an online, distance mode, making it crucially dependent on the proper functioning of the e-tool. To investigate whether adaptive tutorials like ALEKS satisfy the needs of a broad range of learners with different learning styles and preferences, this study analyses the relationships between learners' characteristics and learners' use of a second ALEKS module: business statistics. Shifting the focus of our study to this module allows us to make use of a much richer data set, both in terms of the number of students and available learner characteristics, as would have been the case of investigating the summer course itself.

In contrast to the more static Maple TA-tools described by Brouwer and colleagues , the ALEKS system combines adaptive, diagnostic testing with an electronic learning and practice tutorial in statistics, business statistics and several other domains relevant for higher education. First pillar of ALEKS is the description of all such domains by a hierarchic knowledge structure that specifies the interdependencies between the individual items spanning the domain.

This knowledge structure indicates what knowledge states are feasible, and what are inconsistent. All these feasible knowledge states together constitute the knowledge space. Second pillar of the system is the adaptive assessment engine that provides in an efficient way a probabilistic estimate of the knowledge state of any individual student. Based on that assessment, the system offers material that the student is best able to learn at a given time. In fact, the student can choose from two types of tasks: those belonging to the outer fringe, and those belonging to the inner fringe of the student's knowledge state.

The outer fringe consists of new activities, not practiced before, for which the student masters all prerequisite items new items ready to learn. The inner fringe consists of items the student has practiced before, but for which the mastery level is estimated as less than complete items suggested for review.

The ALEKS assessment module starts with an entry assessment in order to evaluate precisely a student's knowledge state for the given domain e. Business Statistics. Following this assessment, ALEKS delivers a graphic report analyzing the student's knowledge within all curricular areas for the course, based on specified standards. The report also recommends concepts on which the student can begin working; by clicking on any of these concepts or items the student gains access to the learning module.

All problems of the assessment module are algorithmically generated, and require that the student produce authentic input see Figure 1 for a sample assessment item. The assessment is adaptive: the choice of each new question is based on the aggregate of responses to all previous questions. As a result, the student's knowledge state can be found by asking only a small subset of the possible questions typically Assessment results are always framed relative to specified educational standards that can be customized with a syllabus editor part of the instructor module.

Both the assessment and learning modules are automatically adapted to the chosen standards. The learning report, of which Figure 2 shows a part, provides a detailed, graphic representation of the student's knowledge state by means of pie-charts divided into slices, each of which corresponds to an area of the syllabus. In the ALEKS system, the student's progress is shown by the proportion of the slice that is filled in by solid color.

Also, as the mouse is held over a given slice, a list is displayed of items within that area that the student is currently 'ready to learn', as determined by the assessment. For example, Ina has completed four from eight slices in Business Statistics.

Ina can choose to start fulfilling the eleven lessons about inferences, eight about regression, twelve about ANOVA or 10 about Time series. At the conclusion of the assessment ALEKS determines the concepts that the student is currently ready to learn, based on that student's current knowledge state.

These new concepts are listed in the report, and the learning mode is initiated by clicking on any highlighted phrase representing a concept in the list. The focus of the learning mode is a sequence of problems to be solved by the student, representing a series of concepts to be mastered. Setting an participantsParticipants in this study were first year university students in two programs based on the principle of problem-based learning: International Economics and International Business Studies.

The methods course is supported by 'practicals'. Those for statistics are based on the e-learning environment ALEKS, and allow for the measurement of user intensity operationalized as the number of connect hours into the system. Therefore, data on practicals are not representative for students' learning efforts in the whole course.

Vermunt distinguishes in his learning styles model four domains or components of learning: cognitive processing strategies, metacognitive regulation strategies, learning conceptions or mental models of learning, and learning orientations. Each component is composed of five different scales.

The two processing strategies Relating and structuring and Critical processing together compose the 'deep learning' strategy, whereas Memorizing and rehearsing, together with Analysing, compose the 'stepwise learning' strategy also called surface learning in several theories of learning.

The fifth processing strategy is Concrete learning. Similarly, the two regulation scales Self-regulation of learning processes and Selfregulation of learning content together compose the strategy 'self-regulation', hypothesised to be prevalent in deep learning students.

The two regulation scales External regulation of learning processes and External regulation of learning results constitute the 'external regulation' strategy, supposed to be characteristic for stepwise learners. The fifth regulation strategy signals absence of regulation: 'Lack of regulation'. In addition to the ILS, attitudes or achievement motivations toward the subject statistics based on Eccles' expectancy-value theory Eccles, ;Eccles, Adler, Rutterman, Goff, Kaczala et al.

Expectancy-value models take their name from the key role of two components in the motivation to perform on an achievement task: students' expectancies for success, and the task value, that is the value they attribute to succeeding the task. The SATS instrument measures four aspects of post-secondary students' subject attitudes: two expectancy factors that deal with students' beliefs about their own ability and perceived task difficulty: Cognitive competence and Difficulty, and two subjective task-value constructs that encompass students' feelings toward and attitudes about the value of the subject: Affect and Value.

Validation research has shown that a four-factor structure provides a good description of responses to the SATS-instrument in two very large samples of undergraduate students Dauphinee et al. Subsequently, the adequacy of the SATS-instrument for measuring achievement motivations for business subjects has been demonstrated in.

Recently, the instrument is incremented by two more attitudes scales: Interest and Effort, where the last scale represents the willingness of the student to invest time and other efforts in learning the subject. The naming of the Difficulty scale is somewhat counterintuitive, since in contrast to all other scales, lower scores and not higher scores correspond to higher levels of conceived difficulty.

Therefore, the scale is mostly addressed with 'lack of Difficulty' in the next sections. A third group of students' background factors is based upon Dweck's self-theory of intelligence and goal orientations. Dweck's self-theory of intelligence distinguishes two polar types of student beliefs: Entity Theory, the view that intelligence is something one can't change much, and Incremental Theory, the belief that intelligence can be increased through effort and persistence.

Dweck demonstrated that students with the first view are stronger mastery than performance oriented, as opposed to students with the second view. Profiles with regard to these achievement goals will be measured by the Grant and Dweck inventory. That instrument distinguishes six goal types: outcome, ability, normative outcome, normative ability, learning, and challenge-mastery. The last piece of information making up students' profiles is based on Baron-Cohen's empathizing-systemizing E-S theory.

Beyond performance in the e-tool connect time 'HoursALEKS' and final mastery 'MasteryALEKS' , course performance indicators are available, achieved with different assessment instruments being part of the course performance portfolio: quizzes in statistics StatsQz , and the score in the final written exam StatsExam. ResultsOn average, students spend In this amount of time spend on e-learning, students achieve an average mastery level of The adaptive entry test the ALEKS module starts with determines the entry point of any student in the module.

Also the first performance indicator, the score in the quizzes, is strongly related to two other e-tool indicators, and especially mastery in ALEKS: quizzes are administered in the ALEKS-tool, and quiz items correspond to practice items.

The second performance indicator, score in the exam, is quite unrelated to the e-tool. For all four outcome variables, multiple regression models are estimated using all scales making up the student profiles as explanatory variables. Table 1 contains the beta's, the standardized regression coefficients, of these models, with in the last row the percentage of explained variation R 2. In the top of the table, three indicator variables are included: Gender indicating female students , Dutch secondary education, and Math at advanced level in secondary education.

The Gender dummy is nowhere significant. That is an expected outcome, in fact even the prime reason to introduce the e-tool: Dutch secondary math education is very different from math education in many European countries, with a large share of teaching time devoted to statistical topics. For that reason, the use of the e-tool is not much added value for students educated in the Dutch system, explaining the large negative beta's in the equations explaining hours of use and mastery.

A similar, but much weaker role is played by the dummy variable MathMajor: students from these advanced tracks may both have more prior knowledge, and more talents, making them less dependent on the use of the e-tool. Other important predictors of connect time are the goal orientation Learning Goal, the ambition to acquire new knowledge and skills also called mastery orientation , and Effort Planned: the willingness to invest a lot of efforts, and certainly time, in one's study.

The outcome variable that is most unrelated to the use of the e-tool is the score in the final exam: StatsExam. Its main predictors are first the MathMajor dummy, next two attitudes scales Cognitive Competence and Value, and Critical Processing, the most outspoken aspect of deep learning. Amongst the goal orientations, it is the Ability Goal, striving for good performance with a nonnormative goal, that best predicts this achievement measure.

Like connect time, the dummy indicating Dutch secondary education has a strong negative impact. But learning approaches act more similar as in the score in the exam, as do subject attitudes besides planned effort. Discussion and conclusionStudents investigated in this empirical study learn statistics in a blended learning environment that allows them to adapt the use of different learning resources according to personal preferences and dispositions.

It appears that differences in learning dispositions and achievement motivations or subject attitudes account for a substantial part of the variation observed in the intensity of using e-learning. But that is as well true for course performance indicators. When contrasting the four regression models, some striking differences show up. That pattern was the mere reason to introduce the e-learning tool: aimed at students with no or few prior schooling, it is no surprise that these students use the tool more frequently, but still not completely bridge the gap in knowledge caused by prior education differences.

Apparently, the e-tool does not discriminate between different profiles of learners with regard to learning approaches, and in this way is especially helpful for the more surface oriented learners. In contrast, the best goal predictor of exam score is AbilityGoal, the aim to validate one's ability or avoid demonstrating a lack of ability.

A strong learning or mastery orientation is a must to be successful in the e-tool, but no guarantee for success in the exam. This profile deviates from the profile of academically successful students, for whom Affect and Cognitive Competence stand out most, not the willingness to do a lot of studying.

The picture that emerges of the intensive e-learner is that of a learner aware of her or his lack of knowledge, being learning goal oriented, willing to invest a lot in remediating this shortage, and having an orientation toward external regulation. Some of these differences in the profiles between e-learners and academically successful students might be an artifact of a drawback of this study: the fact that the observation of learning intensity is one-sided, in that we were able to measure the intensity of studying with the e-learning tool, but not the intensity of using other components of the blended learning environment.

Therefore, one cannot totally exclude the possibility that e-learners not only use the e-tool with higher intensity than other students, but do so for all components of the blended learning environment. However, given the strong correspondence between the principles on which the e-learning tool ALEKS is based, and the type of learning dispositions of these e-learners, it is highly plausible that the e-tool is of greatest support to students of this specific profile.

So although accommodation of individual differences should not go at the cost of the ultimate goal of raising students to the desired level of self-regulated deep learners, the availability of a blended learning environment encompassing different components that are able to support different types of learners seems of great value, especially in difficult service courses as statistics.

The main contribution of this work is to analyze the classroom as a place where small working teams work and learn together and co-construct knowledge. We propose that the transfer of knowledge between students occurs not only through the work they are doing in their small teams but also through the activities all teams actively share in the larger physical and virtual classroom.

These inter-team relations should reinforce the sociocognitive processes taking place inside each working team. So, the social learning space will reinforce each team's socio-cognitive factors and create a knowledge-sharing environment that will improve learning. Main goal of researchThe main goal of this research is to understand intra-and intergroup learning behaviour in a blended learning environment.

Small working teams construct shared knowledge and try to reach successful collaboration in their social learning space. Collaborative learning environments enrich learning through interaction and therefore obtain better performance on the ascribed tasks than traditional learning environments.

However, research in CSCL and collaborative learning in general shows that the potential effectiveness of group learning is not always reached e. The cognitive perspective stresses the influence of team work on cognitive processes. The social perspective examines the social factors constituting successful performance in team work. So, conceptualizing learning in collaboration has to entail both of them; an understanding of how socio-cognitive processes give rise to cognitive development and an understanding of the social, interpersonal dimension of teamwork.

This means that the identification of the social conditions under which teams make this effort to reach shared knowledge is an essential prerequisite for developing enhanced understanding of successful collaboration. As Van den Bossche, et Al. In other words, Van den Bossche et al. The team learning model specifies when and how teams in collaborative learning environments engage in building and maintaining mutually shared cognition, also referred to as shared mental model Van den Bossche et al.

Research on shared mental models has highlighted that team who develop a shared mental model perform superior than other teams Van den Bossche et al. This paper presents an integrative perspective, building on the strengths of different research strands. It includes both the learning behaviour of the team and conditions in the interpersonal context that contribute to engagement in the development of mutually shared cognition practices.

So, the learning behaviours that positively influence the development of this mutually shared cognition are the co-construction of meaning and the constructive conflict in the interaction of the team. Besides, this research focuses in the beliefs about the interpersonal context which influence this team learning behaviour.

The group-level beliefs that potentially affect the learning behaviour are psychological safety, cohesion, potency and interdependence. Thus, this research states that "the identification of the social conditions under which teams make the effort to reach shared knowledge is an essential prerequisite for developing enhanced understanding of successful collaboration" Van den Bossche et al.

But, as Webb and Palincsar noted, few researchers have investigated these kinds of social factors that influence team learning in educational settings. Proposition 1: Effective teams are able to create the right social and cognitive environment, fostering the development of a shared mental model. Learning inside and across teams: a common learning spaceThe socio-cognitive processes through which members of a team collaborate in class do not occur in a vacuum but are influenced by the social context in which they take place Keyton, The social context affects the certain learning space: a place where the agents in the learning process, teachers and students, are together; in a collaborative classroom which nourishes the willingness to engage in the joint effort to build and maintain mutually shared cognition Barron, ;Crook, Within educational psychology, limited research has been conducted in order to assess whether sub teams in a classroomsetting also learn from the experiences of other teams in their class and what the underlying mechanisms for these learning spaces are.

However, this capacity of a space to improve agent's outcomes is well studied for firms and its innovation process, in a stream of literature related with regional economics. This strand of research can provide insights to study learning across teams. However, the empirical results of these studies identified small firms as much more innovative than bigger ones. These contrasting results underlined the need for introducing other explanatory variables vital for fostering the innovation process.

These external factors are named "knowledge spillovers" and refer to positive influences that firms received in terms of knowledge from the environment in which they operate. As Gerosky underlines, the proximity to other firms can be essential in increasing the innovation capacity of a firm independently of internal firm characteristics. There is an agreement in literature on the fact that physical proximity among firms plays a crucial role in improving their innovative capacity.

Space matters because of the existence of knowledge spillovers but this space is not only physical but also made of all the different relationships built among local actors. This cultural proximity is the basis for the existence of explicit and implicit cooperation among actors and public and private partnership.

The main contribution of the present study is to combine the findings of shared mental models in team-based research with the concepts of knowledge spillovers between learners, which are drawn from research on regional economics. In other words, we want to offer a theoretical framework to analyze the classroom as the place where small working teams develop their social and learning exchanges.

Team 1 consists of five members who learn and work together on several tasks, which is represented by the five actors and their links. In order to effectively learn from each other, the five members of the team have to focus on both the cognitive and social processes in order to develop a shared mental model Barron, ;Van den Bossche et al. Teams who effectively establish a shared mental model are illustrated by the circle around each team in Figure 1.

The new element in our research is that teams not necessarily learn in isolation in a classroom. In fact, learners in a classroom naturally interact or link with their peers outside their team, which might lead to knowledge spillovers from Team 1 to Team 2 or to Team n. These inter-team relations, based on daily personal contact and learning interaction should reinforce the socio-cognitive processes taking place inside each working team. We propose that the transfer of knowledge between students occurs not only through the work they are doing in their small teams but also through the activities all teams actively shared in the classroom.

So, we argue that the social and learning space in a classroom is able to reinforce each team's socio-cognitive factors and is able to create a knowledge-sharing environment that will improve learning. Figure 1: Shared Mental Model and Knowledge SpilloverProposition 2: In addition to interacting within a team, learners are also interacting with other learners outside their team, which will enhance knowledge spillovers across teams.

One of the main assumed advantages of using ICT in education is that learners can learn in a flexible and challenging manner. In addition, the developments of ICT in the last years are so rapid that currently several ICT tools offering rich blended classrooms can be used by teachers and students to learn in a challenging and interactive manner Cho, ;Hurme et al.

For example, at Maastricht University in a course E-business and E-Economics students were assisted in their learning process when they were not physically at the university by using discussion forums. Students in the intervention cohort were more satisfied with their learning processes than students who did not use discussion forums. As a result, in Figure 2 the integration of the blended learning space with the face-to-face learning space is illustrated.

Figure 2: Shared Mental Model and Knowledge Spillover in a blended learning environmentProposition 3: Extending the learning space from a face-to-face environment to a blended learning environment will lead to more knowledge spillovers. Proposition 4: The extent to which teams use the online settings for knowledge construction is explained by the degree in which teams have developed a shared mental model SettingIn the near future, a study is conducted to test the above formulated proposition.

This study takes place in an elective 3rd year course of Business Administration in the Economics Faculty at University of Oviedo. The aim of this course is to introduce students in international economic relations. The participants are between Spanish and Erasmus students enrolled in this course. The students are assumed to meet twice a week, in two-hour session, during 14 weeks period.

The course uses a blended learning approach with collaborative learning methodology, combining whole class work with team work. The working teams have to solve five authentic tasks related with international economics. These working teams consist of five members, who are self-selected by the students themselves. The instructional design offers the teams several opportunities to share knowledge. Intra-and inter-team interaction tools have been planned both in the face-to-face and in the online environment.

Table 1 summarize the elements of the instructional design that promote the different types of teams' interactions. Class time devoted to whole class work: presentations, discussions, analysis and assessment of other teams' products… Task-specific forum to discuss about tasks and analyse and assess other teams' products.

Feedback and corrections through the forum In the face-to-face setting, during the class time, each team could reach mutually shared cognition in the moments devoted to team work, when the teams work on their own on the different tasks. The interteam exchanges in the face-to-face setting could happen in the moments devoted to whole class work: presentations, discussions, questions asking and answering, analysis and assessment of other teams' products…Besides the face-to-face, the online environment serves as support and collaboration tool for teams working.

The intra-team interaction in the VLE is canalized through team private forum and Wikis. Some tasks are provided with a Wiki so teams can collaborative writing assigned papers or presentations. The use of a wiki tool is a big help to introduce comments and corrections about a work in process and assist teams in their co-construction processes. The learning across teams in the VLE is promoted through task-specific fora.

These are general fora where all team members can participate and make possible to discuss about the different tasks, ask doubts and propose solutions and share information between teams. This design tries to resemble the face-to-face setting, where there are moments for collaborative teams to work on their own and moments for the whole class to work all together see figure 2.

The online tools are also an important element to provide feedback. So, electronic means of communication available on the VLE are used to return corrections and comments both about the final quality of the products but also about the discussion and construction process. Thus, special emphasis is placed by the teacher on ways to improve the tasks, focusing on process rather on content. Once the tasks are finished all working teams can analysed the products from the other classmates both by presentations to the whole class and through the VLE.

So, each working team elaborates and actively construct their knowledge in the face-to face sessions and in the VLE. Normally the assigned activities are presented, explained and began in the physical classroom and then continued through the online tools. During all type of interactions, students are supposed to actively construct knowledge together in collaboration and both settings become the common learning space for all teams.

Blended learning, blended ideas -collaboration vs. The role of collaboration and self-learning in this kind of learning methodology is still a subject of theoretical and empirical studies. This paper will present the question of collaborative learning in blended learning and, in general terms, ICT supported course. Starting from theoretical deliberations, the text will focus on the researches conducted in frame of two European projects.

We would like to present lessons learned from two kinds of ICT supported courses: for students and for teachers. These courses show that collaborative learning can be seen as a subject to be studied and at the same time constitutes the way the course participants are learning.

Finally, we would like to present the outcomes of the second project research on collaborative blended learning while trying to design effective ICT supported remedial course. Theoretical approaches to blended learningIn fact, there are a lot of definitions and approaches describing what blended learning is. Therefore, the term "blended learning" concerns both pedagogical approach, learning methods, using media, technology and relations between all of them, bearing in mind what to learn Gynther, Thus, blended learning is a term multidimensional and with wide number of meanings.

However, the clearest and the most popular of all these definitions is blended learning as a kind of learning method combining face-to-face classes and e-learning. Because it is not a pure e-learning, there is an opportunity to eliminate the defects which many of the educational researchers underline in pure elearning. Likewise, not being a pure face-to-face traditional learning -blended learning let us take all the best from this kind of learning, minimizing its negative aspects.

Obviously, the important question is still how to mix these two approaches techniques, methodologies in order to obtain effective course or training -what should be the content of the curriculum, which part of this content should be performed in a traditional way and which one with ICT support, finally -what ICT techniques and tools should be used. Having these problems in mind, blended learning allows maximization of the course effectiveness by matching the best methodology for each of the course parts.

For example, blended learning course designer should remember that typical face-to-face classes are suited for workshops, coaching, exercises, feedback on activities and paper-based tests moreover, in each learning situation where social interaction and the dialogue between a student and a teacher are needed. In turn "live" e-learning is good for application exercises, online coaching, interaction between students, online feedback, assessment, chats and instant messaging. What is concerned self-paced e-learning goes for simulations, online case studies, interactive learning modules, e-mail, bulletin boards interactions, online assessments, and other forms of computer based training Harriman, The table presents another possible matching between activities and methods in a blended learning course.

Undeniable advantages of blended learning are not only varied possibilities of combining and personal adaptation of pedagogical methods but also some specific benefits resulting both from implementing ICT support and face-to-face approaches. There are three basic assets of using online methods in blended learning course listed in the subject literature: cost reduction especially the parts of the course realized online, personal costs related to the presence and mobility of teachers, rental costs, etc.

Taking into consideration face-to-face learning, the benefits are possibilities to take social interaction, live collaboration and the dialogue between a student and a teacher. Collaborative learning as an element of ICT supported courseWhat is a place of collaboration in ICT supported learning, named also blended learning? To answer this question, it is worth to think about using collaboration tools in both ICT-based and traditional face-to face learning.

It seems that collaboration is one of the most important factors of learning, often listed with communication. In face-to face learning collaboration is a main part of didactical process. Primarily, it is collaboration between a student and teachers, who communicate, discuss and assess each other. In turn, in an online course the collaboration is, of course, an opportunity to have a contact between a tutor and learners but if we consider online self-learning the collaborative learning may also manifests itself in using the collaborations tools as chat, instant messengers, forum or others Web 2.

Therefore, collaborative learning is a crucial part of both kinds of learning. These are: technology, instructors, students, and pedagogy. On the basis of their research, they have defined several factors existing in each field. These factors are important in terms of creation effective and satisfactory blended learning course.

But the most important factors common for all areas are: communication, collaboration, and interaction. The figure below visualizes this theory. Curiously enough, the same research shows that the perceived communication, collaboration, and satisfaction levels of students differ according to their levels of computer and Internet literacy such as level of computer usage, level of the Internet usage, frequency of computer usage, and frequency of the Internet usage. But, what seems to be a problem in terms of students is that they not always recognize how to implement saving ICT informal knowledge in educational context.

What are the main tools of collaboration in online environment? But a special area of using ICT for reinforcing collaboration is assessment and giving feedback in blended learning course. The teacher can benefit from e-mails, dedicated web sites, forums, learning platforms and social sites for giving an immediate feedback and doing an individual as well as group assessment.

What is more, these tools give an opportunity of peer assessment, providing informal feedback on the tasks Enerson et al. In should be underlined that there is still one important point in the collaboration matter: a distinction between collaborative learning and cooperative learning. In cooperative learning students do the subtasks independently and then provide one, common solution. However, the task division into groups or, rather, roles observer, evaluator, motivator etc.

Success stories and lessons learned from the both COMBLE coursesTaking into consideration wide literature review and numerous experiences of different educational institutions, it is worth underlining that the idea of blended learning -generally groundbreaking, up-to-date and prospective -also may cause some problems.

Most often, students are familiar with the Internet and its tools but -as we mentioned above -they often do not have experience in using them in educational context. What also may cause a problem is the need for combining different pedagogical methods and learning activities into face-to-face classes with e-learning.

It is the overall objective of COMBLE project and all its participating partners from three areas of education: higher education, vocational and continuing education, from four countries: Germany, Denmark, Poland and Estonia. Because of this meaningful knowledge gaps in instructional designing or usage of blended learning methods and techniques above mentioned and according to main objectives of the COMBLE project, two different courses were developed and conducted: one for students Blended Learning Driver's License Course and the second one for teachers Blended Learning Expert Course.

This paper will present them in the context of application the collaborative learning as an element of ICT supported course. The first of created courses BLDLC is a typical self-learning course multimedia course with elearning platform support and the second one BLEC uses methodology of collaborative and problem based learning e-learning platform and lectures in Second Life.

Taking into account different needs of these two target groups different methodologies are used in both cases. Collaborative learning in the case of student course is a subject to be learnt and in the second case course for teachers it is the way the participants are learning. Students, as mentioned above, often have problems with applying blended learning tools in the process of learning.

These students who are less familiar with ICT event don't know what the possibilities this technology provides. Thus, course designers decided to prepare self-learning online course which would introduce the students into the world of the tools allowing them to use available online resources to supports the traditional education. Firstly, students could learn about blended learning in general terms and get to know the definitions.

Then, they obtained information about online learning technique, their own learning styles and also about Virtual Learning Environment. The next part of the course dealt with collaboration and communication in blended learning as the main body of this learning methodology. Collaboration is everything -that was a keyword of this part. Students could find there an explanation of synchronous and asynchronous communication, and then the various tools of communication were presented.

Another part of the course concerned social aspects in online supported learning, based on Web 2. At the end of the course the psychological problems were covered motivation, time management, resources management, searching requested information in online environment.

The course and the participants were moderated and guided by the tutor on the Moodle platform where the additional tasks, place for sharing experiences and a final test were put. The second part concerned collaboration directly. The third part, relevant to the tools of Web 2.

Because in fact, what are creation of Wiki, taking part in the social networking sites, exchange of virtual video or voice resources? Here, collaboration is placed in the defined, interactive and open environment where its main sense is accomplished in the social space. Generally the collaboration questions in BLDLC course were assessed well with average 4,5 points in a 5-point scale.

The participants appreciated the course content and its organization. However, the comments like this also appeared: "maybe the curse should be longer and connected with more time of synchronous activities". The importance of collaborative aspects of blended learning possibilities was assessed quite high -between average 4, and 4,75 points. As the students indicated almost all collaborative aims achieved only the ability to operate and use the six tools of social interaction: blog, virtual gallery, Wiki, You Tube, podcast and social-networking sites gained, on average, less than 4 points -the effectiveness of the course could be classified as high.

Knowledge about collaboration in ICT supported learning is really needed and an organized content of the appropriate course came across students expectations. But the most important technique used in this course was collaboration of all the participants. The collaboration appeared during asynchronous, written communication on the Moodle platform and also during synchronous, oral activities in online world Second Life.

As far as SL is concerned, the course took advantage of innovatory forms of cooperation with virtual world offers. The participants, not having the possibility to interact with each other in real life international teams , could become avatars and participate in a common event in the same place and at the same time. They had an opportunity to run live discussions which was great from the facilitators' perspective, giving a chance for an immediate feedback, quick assessment and appropriate reaction.

It is based on an active participation of learners who are to express their opinion on a given subject by choosing one of the opinions agree, against, neutral, etc. Thus, this exercise is a kind of discussion based on virtual communication and synchronous participation. Whole course lasted 6 weeks, with 9 lectures in SL and many asynchronous discussions on Moodle forums. Participants, divided into national groups, had an objective to fulfill developing a miniproject related to real life and based on PBBL approach.

After finishing the course the participants have evaluated the particular indicators, together with group collaboration and role of the facilitators in the course. Here are a few opinions from this evaluation discussion: I feel connected of course mostly to the danish team but also to the rest of the participants in a way, that I never thought possible after 6 weeks working together only online and never meeting in RL.

I have really learned a lot too. ITo sum up, the lesson learned from this course: the collaboration and communication as a technique used in experts learning is really fruitful and effective during realization of the task based on the PBBL approach. Particularly, it proves not to fulfill the main purpose of the course because from the teacher's perspective the students could learn not "how to" prepare BL course but "what actually is" BL course.

The number of planned activities as SL lectures was too large in relation to quite short duration time. What is more and curiously enough, there were some problems with cultural differences in what is to be considered the standards in working on the projects. However, the collaboration part of the course leading in an innovative way was a huge success and beside of being a tool for proper task preparation, it turned into an instrument of building the social community.

Some of the participants would like to work in international but interest-focused groups. Others enjoyed national teams as more cultural and language "tolerant". It could constitute an inspiring aspect of another research -if we agree that collaboration is something good in ICT supported course. The question is how to organize people working in the international environment and being at different educational levels and having various needs.

Likewise, the opinions about SL as a collaborative milieu were diversified, some of the participants pointed at too little time for asynchronous effective discussions on the platform and too much involvement into virtual meetings. Suggestions on how to use collaborative learning in remedial courseWe can also benefit from the outcomes of research on collaborative blended learning courses while we try to design effective ICT supported remedial courses in the frame of another European project STEP -Studies on Transitional Electronic Programs.

Remedial courses are specific as their participants very often have different learning needs, competences and different social and educational backgrounds. They are also a challenge for teachers or designers who have to prepare one effective course for participants with a variety of needs. Many remedial courses are supported by ICT. The question which may appears: are collaborative learning tools needed in remedial courses and if so for what? STEP Project was focused on analyzing of traditional and remedial courses -both real examples of the courses in European countries and world literature concerned the remedial education in general.

Four partners in the project -the educational institution from the Netherlands, Belgium, Lithuania, and Polandworked on collected data to choose the best practices and decide how to support remedial courses in the most effective way by ICT methods. The main aim of the project was to develop a framework of assessing and comparing online supported preparatory transitional programs.

One of the actions in STEP project was gathering the empirical data on three levels -first from the partners' institution, then from each partner country institutions and finally from various European institutes. This research was conducted with the use of an online survey consisting of questions regarding didactical and organizational aspects of remedial teaching. The kind of the learning subject, didactical methods, general objectives of the course and, obviously, ICT support were taken into account.

The survey took place between February and May The courses from 65 institutions and from 22 countries were analyzed. One of the crucial parts of the survey was evaluation of collaboration and communication use in remedial courses. Application of this learning method or its elements seems to be very important during transitional programs planning. Nowadays, we have to deal with a large number of international students within Europe.

Their presence on the remedial courses rises increasingly because of necessity to be flexible and open not only on the educational area but also on the dynamic job market. They have to deal with cultural differences, not to mention the dissonances between levels of countries' educational systems.

The involvement in learning course subject by using collaboration methods and tools, especially when they are ICT supported, lets the students not only improve their knowledge but also defeat communication and multicultural problems. The results of STEP research show that area of collaboration work vs. From courses, 57 were specified as the courses which used collaboration method. Curiously enough, these are the courses concerning language and social disciplines rather than science.

This phenomenon could be explained by higher ability of collaboration in social sciences in which education seems to be less formal, less focused on rigid knowledge, more skill-and cooperation-oriented. In this range of courses, collaboration is possible and expected, as the factor both facilitating the learning process and having value on its own. Another observation from project research is that, the more ICT in remedial courses, the more collaboration.

It results from a wide range of possibilities of effective collaboration instruments which are accessible when ICT tools are used. It should be noticed that collaboration in social "soft" remedial courses does not exclude using individual work, which is also applied in these courses.

But it is worth underlining that with the use of blended learning techniques, the use of the individual work is decreased. However, in the global interpretation of the research results, it is evident that collaboration as learning methods or techniques is used in almost all analyzed courses. Only one group of 22 courses from science "hard" area is firmly classified as collaboration free. It leads to the statement and recommendation that collaboration is needed in remedial courses and is introduced especially if ICT is used.

As mentioned above, collaboration not only provides the students with more effective learning of the subjects, but it is also integrated and acculturated in a new social environment faster than the one focused only on an individual work.

Allen, E. Sizing the opportunity: The quality and extent of online education in the United States, and Lifelong learning, an educational tradition, rests on a notion that it is the individual's own choice of pursuit of knowledge, skills and values. However, the continual quest for learning is becoming more significant with the emerging technologies and changing lifestyle.

The rapid change in innovations and interventions in the workplace makes it practically impossible for every individual to be "completely trained" in terms of transfer of learning. Workplace situation is a variable thereby posing different challenges for similar occupations.

Thus, the question of choice becomes meaningless as the urgency arises. In this context, lifelong learning becomes critical to complement and supplement existing work-based learning or even primary, secondary and tertiary education. ReferencesThis study highlights the obstacles in lifelong learning in the local context that can be extrapolated to the global perspective.

Qualitative data was obtained through the inspection of policy documents and interviews. The findings showed that the vision for life long learning is well documented in the nation's policies. The aspects discussed are potential resolutions in facilitating the concept of "education for all and "easy accessibility for all".

Democratization of education has been made possible by adopting multiple strategies. The "open entry" system for all citizens in the country to pursue lifelong learning programmes with a nominal and flexible fee structure facilitates the participation from community members.

The wide range of courses offered, with features of customization, recognition and accreditation positions lifelong learning programmes as a "stepping stone" for facilitating development of human capital, social capital and culture capital. E-portfolio for competence development during internships of teacher education IntroductionPortfolio as a concept originates from the world of arts and architecture.

Artists use it as a medium to show a compilation of their best work to promote it to prospective customers. Due to the proliferation in use and of different approaches to portfolio numerous definitions can be found Janssens, Boes and Wante, Based on review of literature on portfolios and research evidence Davies and LeMahieu claim that student choice and ownership are key factors for student motivation.

Meeus and Van Looy b report that, depending on the purpose of the portfolio student choice varies concerning choice of competencies to be proven, choice of formal portfolio aspects and choice of portfolio content. Zeichner and Wray in Van Tartwijk et al, underline the importance of finding a balance between students personal freedom and imposed formal criteria. The selected artifacts have to meet following criteria: prove the competence level at a particular moment, outline students own further objectives, illustrate how next steps in his growing process will be taken.

An individual's learning process can only be made visible through reflection. Korthagen and colleagues in Driessen, defined reflection as the "mental process of trying to structure or restructure an experience, a problem, or existing knowledge or insights" and in line with this definition, they developed a model for cyclic professional development, based on reflection on experience, known as the ALACT model.

Kathpalia and Heah investigated several ways to promote the process of self-reflection by students: defining reflection, modeling, completing reflective statements, reflective prompts, reflection checklist, reflective journals, weblogs. Reflection is not merely an individual and solitary act, on the contrary, it "often includes dialogue and conversation with a coach, a mentor, an adviser, or a peer.

So, coaching students to help them in developing these skills is essential. This shift from a portfolio in a threering-binder to an electronic portfolio is more than just a change in format. As added value, electronic portfolios allow "students to create their own sense of interconnections between artifacts" Norton-Meier, Moreover, Pullman proclaimed that hypertext was a new way of thinking that can lead to a new art-form. This adds a new feature to the portfolio concept.

In addition to this, electronic portfolios are more portable Pullman, , look more sophisticated Pullman, and permit coaching from a distance. E-portfolio is easily accessible Johnson in Lin, and can be accessed from remote locations Strudler and Wetzel, Interaction between students and lectures, students and peers Chang, ;Pullman, , and other possible stakeholders is possible Chang, ;Janssens, et al.

The capacity to store artifacts using different media e. United Black Students won big as two of their members, seniors Gabrielle Hands and Anthony Preston were crowned king and queen. HP Concerts was the committee that worked to bring this event to campus.

Free student and guest tickets were passed out in the Breezeway, all students had to do was just show their Cane Card. The doors to the Watsco Center opened at 6 p. Both artists were a hit with the attendees of the concert and many said it was one of the best productions yet. Photo by Kristian DelRosario.

Photo by Delta Delta Delta. Photo by Sabrina Cheikhali. Organizations compete as they dance their way through a magically themed storybook referencing the U and its rich history. Points are given to each team based on choreography, plotline and mentioning the Homecoming sponsors in their skit. Voices of UM fill The Rock with the their own renditions of the Alma Mater for a chance to perform at the homecoming game. FEC won big again by placing first.

Throughout the week prior to the concert, backstage passes and priotiy floor access are given out to students through social media giveaways. New construction on campus could not hold the parade back as they changed their route and marched on. Each organization made signs based on the "Magic In U" theme and showed off their school spirit. Photo courtesy Zeta Tau Alpha. As per tradition, the university serves the best as they invite top food trucks to supply the hungry 'Canes.

With music blaring, the homcoming festivities continue as students, alumni and the Miami community come together to celebrate school spirit. Photo by Haley Nepple. During the biggest Homecoming tradition, the boat burning and fireworks leaves viewers in awe as the specticle sets the tone for the game to come.

Before the boat is set to burn, the winners of the Homecoming competition are announced. For the first time ever, two organizations, the Federacion Estudiantes Cubanos and the Association of Commuter Students, tie for first place. The 'Canes continue their winning streak as they leave Virginia Tech in the dust -- final score With this win, the 'Canes were up an eight-game winning streak prompting Instagram captions like "The U is back" and "You can't spell Undefeated without the U.

Photo by Steven Tribuno. Photo by Alexa Fragoso. Photo by Jacob Quinn. Photo by Veronica Garcia. Photo by Sarah Stankard. Photo by Jocelyn Kane. Instead of a month-long break, students only had three weeks of winter break due to Hurricane Irma. This didn't stop them from enjoying their much needed time off with their friends and family By Samatha Budd.

Photo by Andrea Candelaria. Photo by David Palma. Known as Champagne Papi, Drake pays a visit to the Coral Gables campus to award a lucky student with a scholarship and shoot footage for his music video, 'God's Plan'. I don't think I've ever been to a more turnt school than this. Junior Destiny James received a scholarship in big check fashion, hand delivered by Drake himself during his visit to the U.

James is a public health major that always dreamed of coming to the U. Grateful, she thanked him over and over stunned by the experience. Photo courtesy Frost. By Alize Ramirez-Canas. Sass, big hair, bold makeup, high heels and a lot of glitter. Not your average Thursday night at the Rat.

This was no average Thursday night, however. Along with the professional queens, student performers were also encouraged to participate. This was his second time performing, but his first time with backup dancers. Celebrating their 50th anniversary, the Council of International Students and Organizations hosts an International Week like no other with the theme 'Remembering Our Roots,' encouraging students from around the world to remember where they came from By Jorge Chabo.

Each night, dinner selections are free to students and based off of popular dishes from the region celebrated. Photo by Alize RamirezCanas. For the 50th anniversary of International Week, COISO wanted to highlight the importance of not only understanding the different backgrounds of the UM community, but also the importance of listening and learning about our differences and similarities. Photo by Casey Lue. Jane Arcalas.

As for how it turned out, Vice President Maheshi Pathirana believes it was one of their best. Sophomore Jheanelle Miller and junior Mirza Tanis man the table on Latin America and Caribbean night and offer sodas and juices from the regions to students. Students were able to participate in a variety of activities and sample food to learn about each region.

After, students enjoyed performances by Irish step dancers and Middle Eastern belly dancers while eating falafel and bratwurst. Dishes from different Asian countries were served, like dumplings and lo mein. A local Afro-Brazilian group performed a traditional capoeira, which is a martial art style of dance, and UM's Salsa Craze performed as well. African entrees like peri-peri wings and madombi were offered while students watched the performances.

Many other traditions celebrating Asian and Middle Eastern culture were highlighted in the stalls that dotted the UC Patio. With movements like March For Our Lives and MeToo being shown all over the media, it was only a matter of time until it was seen on campus. Walk A Mile In Her Shoes is an event where men walk in red heels to raise awareness about sexual violence.

The hashtag NeverAgain trended on social media as survivors used the high-profile case to activate change. On March 24, a month after the student protests were held around the nation, including Miami, in support of tighter gun control laws. Photo by Megan Lipsky. Photo courtesy Patricia Colon. Photo by Jorge Chabo.

Photo by Joe Biden. Photo by Jenny. Her name is on the biggest building on campus and now her name is going to be in the polls. Although running for Congress has been on her mind for a while, it was her students who inspired her to finally go for it. Photo courtesy UM Media. The last time the Eagles qualified for the Super Bowl was in , and previously The city of Philadelpha erupted in cheers at the end of the game and fans took to the streets to celebrate the victorious moment.

On the afternoon of Feb. The gunman set off the fire alarm, causing students and teachers to crowd the hallways as he began shooting with an AR15 rifle. The shooting resulted in 17 fatalities - 15 were on school grounds while the other two passed from injuries after being admitted into a local hospital. The gunman was previously a student at the school, but was expelled in for behavorial issues.

The Games featured events with 2, athletes participating. After a statesponsored doping was exposed, Russia was suspended from competeting. Select athletes, however, were allowed to compete neutrally. North Korea and South Korea entered the opening ceremony as a unified Korea, despite tense relations.

Norway was awared the most medals with 39 total, followed by Germany with 31 and Canada with Sean White won his third gold medal in the men's snowboarding halfpipe event, making him the first American to win gold at three separate Winter Olympics. Hawking is known for his work in cosmology, astronomy and mathematics. According to the administrator of prizes, Dana Canedy, the vote was unanimous among board members, who were considering more than candidates for the prize.

In , Bergling had retired from the music scene due to health problems, including severe stress and poor mental health. Photo courtesy Nicole Thornton. As a recent grad and medical campus teaching assistant, Malik can be found running with one or all of his dogs. Photo courtesy Malik Bibby. Photo courtesy UPup. From Caribbean cruises to domestic plane rides, students take a break from the books and other responsibilites for a week-long adventure.

Even though Miami is the place to be yearround, most opt for a change of scenery during Spring Break to experience new places and things. Photo by Isabella Di Giglio. Photo by Vee Masangu. Photo by Felicitas Amon. Photo by Kenny Diaz. Photo by Michelle Williams. A: We had some major, showthreatening set-backs during the rehearsal process that would have been very easy to become stressed over, but knowing that the PSM sets the example and tone for her assistants and the actors, I had to consciously handle the situations with grace and a sense of humor rather than allowing my worries to show, which was difficult but proved do-able.

The identity thieving Pirates vogue to show off their newly stolen characters. Stolen identities include Smokey the Bear and Guy Fieri. Among other elements, clothing was tacked on one wall to display the various type of attire that victims were wearing when they were attacked, fighting the belief that victims were wearing "revealing" clothing.

As part of their Social Justice Week, the Butler Center for Service and Leadership puts on a multimedia exhibit designed to bring awareness to and provoke thought-changing ideas on issues of oppression. Participants explore the topics with a guided tour through a set of rooms i. Some references in the exhibit included the MeToo movement that took over social media last fall and racist remarks made by President Trump. Planning for the tunnel begins in the fall with student volunteers working with student organizations that decide the topic and concept for each room.

TAKEN Lights highlighted the movement of victims of human trafficking in order to show that human trafficking is not stationary. Despite the harsh weather, the carnival and concert enjoyed crowds who celebrated the last campus party of the year By Jorge Chabo.

However, before students can lock themselves in the library to study far into the night, they get a chance to breath a sign of relief as the university puts up rides and games as well as a spring concert. First up was COIN as they opened the show. Although there was much rain that night, students still came out for the show — loyal fans and newcomers alike. The Nashville-based group are known for being one of the first bands to foster the growing genre of indie pop, a modern sound that blends together old school rock with new age synths and pop.

They played songs from their new album as well as a few oldies. Students cheered, danced, and even cried as they performed one of their sadder songs near the end. And since they were ending the night, it was a perfect wrap up as students got to hear a range of songs they already knew, remixed to the tune of a good time. He performed their top hit "Talk Too Much," which was a crowd favorite.

Photo by Abigail Adeleke. There were three, with each serving a different cusine. Miami night life was brought to the WATSCO Center for the third annual Commencement Ball where graduating seniors celebrated their final weeks of their college career with music, food and dancing. Tickets sold out and over students attended the event.

There were three food stations that served different cuisines like Asian, Italian and Cuban food. At the end of the event, the Alumni Association gave attendees a gift bag that included an alumni license plate and information on alumni benefits. Renowned professors, dedicated students and award-winning programs - it's no wonder why this school is consistently in the top Musical theatre majors were able to hold his Tony while he spoke about his experience in broadway.

Photo by Mitchell Zachs. Between the high-accomplishing student body, the dedicated faculty and the supportive staff, the University of Miami has ranked high among other universities, landing in the top 50, and has earned several bragging rights to its name Source: UM Factbook , UM's Social Media Platforms, Wall Street Journal and US News Rankings.

Abrams Betty G. Amos Jose P. Bared Fred Berens M. Anthony Burns Charles E. Cobb Edward A. George Thelma V. Stone Patricia W. Toppel David R. Weaver G. Wood, Sr. National Members Nicholas A. Buoniconti Steven J. Green Lois Pope Alex E. Beneby Tracey P. Berkowitz Marc A. Buoniconti Alfred R. Camner Wayne E. Chaplin Paul J. DiMare Joseph J. Echevarria, Jr. David L. Epstein Richard D. Herbert Marilyn J.

Mann Stuart A. Miller William L. Perez Michael J. Piechoski Aaron S. Podhurst Steven J. Saiontz Laurie S. Silvers H. Smith, Jr. Steven Sonberg E. Jimenez Thomas E. Cejas Laura G. Coulter-Jones Carlos M. Edward W. Easton Gloria M. Estefan Enrique C. Falla, Sr. Alfonso Fanjul Peter T. Fay David I. Fuente M. Lee Pearce Fredric G. Reynolds Eduardo M.

Scruggs Robert C. Strauss Gonzalo F. Valdes-Fauli Marta S. Weeks-Wulf Barbara A. Weintraub Frances L. Wolfson Charles J. Every year, the University of Miami gratefully receives grants from numerous sources that help fund research and other endeavors throughout the school year. Newly appointed and returning deans and administrators pride themselves in the skill, cooperation and patience to ensure the smooth operation of the university.

Fellows apply to positions shared with and specifically for Foote Fellows to get the most out of the program. Q: How has your experience changed throughout the duration of your time at UM being involved in this program? A: Over the past four years, this program has given me opportunities to meet other students and to be more involved in the UM community. The University of Miami is looking for well-rounded individuals to be a part of this program.

A: The Foote Fellow Program allows me to explore multiple areas of education rather than just focusing on one area. Foote fellows are also. Candidates for the Ronald A. Hammond Scholarship attend a two-day event where they participate in scholarship interviews, interact with current Hammond Scholars, and learn about the academic opportunities available at UM. Hammond Scholars receive academic support from the Office of Academic Enhancement, where a deliberate effort is made to connect students to academic and professional resources, both on and off campus.

A: It offers us financial support, academic advising, and a family-like atmosphere to help us in our social lives. The goal of the OAE is to help students achieve their highest potential academically and to help us grow to be the best people we can be socially. We get opportunities to go to events together, interact with the staff, and more.

I would say the greatest benefit the program gives us is a sense of unity, and a support system of other students and faculty of color who help make us successful. The opportunity to interact with other students of color who share a determination to be the best they can be is nothing but an inspiration. Many of my fellow Hammonds have become some of my greatest friends and together we work to make each other better.

A: To continue to grow and create memories with this group, but even more to see all the new faces who will join us over the next few years. I love meeting the incoming Hammonds; it brings me back to the excitement I first felt coming on campus to interview and then being informed of my receiving the scholarship. My Hammond advisor has been with me through my highs and my lows, yet has always had me leaving every meeting with a smile on my face.

The Hammond program is a family. Being amongst a group of determined individuals for four years, has made me compete to be the best. As a Hammond, you quickly learn that there will always be someone in your corner, even when you go astray. I am very grateful for community and the family I have with Hammond scholars and advisors.

With 12 different schools and colleges and over majors, students have a plethora of options when choosing their focus of study Source: UM Factbook Q: How have the different projects helped you prepare for the real world? Do you have a project that has been most memorable? A: From the very first semester, all architecture students take a six-credit studio design course. The class functions similar to that of an architecture office in that we each have our own desks and individually work on our projects while our professors come around, monitoring and helping us in the projects progress.

Each semester has had a different theme and program and I think the semester that has been most memorable thus far and given me the most real-world experience has been my current studio, which is called Comprehensive Studio.

In this course, in addition to our usual design process, we produce all the necessary drawings a project in the real world would entail, like structural, electrical, and plumbing, just to name a few. Photo courtesy UM SoA. Architecture students at from all levels design a vibrant performance stage below the Miami transit station in Brickell. The students created this artistically designed space using a bright orange color to both show off their design skills while showing school spirit.

The performance stage is designed with a series of poles that come in an array of sizes and are strategically arranged to stimulate the eyes. The stage is meant to hold various performance arts events, such as poetry readings, ethnic dances, comedy, poetry and more. The stage was strategically designed.

It is also equipped with lights placed on the T-shaped poles located at the front and back of the square base in order to illuminate the stage for night performances. The stage was installed to coincide with the Art Basel fair and wider Miami art week. Photo courtesy Josh Kleinberg. A: My freshman and sophomore year classes really emphasized the theory and history of architecture. We learned basic vocabulary and designed our projects through looking at the past. In the process, each student has begun to develop their own style.

Now we are learning the technical aspects such as, structure and MEP mechanical, electrical and plumbing and all the necessary elements to put a building together within our own creative mindset. In terms of preparing for the real world, I have learned several programs and more than anything how to conceptualize a project and use my knowledge to make it a reality. My most memorable project was a student and faculty housing assignment located in downtown Miami.

It was my first large scale design, and the process helped me develop leadership, technical, graphical, and stylistic skills. I really like that it is a constantly changing field and there is so much room for innovation and creativity. I have always been interested in science and amazed at the complexity of life.

Being aware of how the angle at which just one atom is bound to a molecule changes the behavior of the entire molecule, or how changing one amino acid in a chain of hundreds if not thousands of them can cause a life threatening disease reminds me how delicate and remarkable life is.

Psychology reminds me how our actions and instincts are the result of a much deeper cause shaped by the functions of society, biology, and nature. We must always be searching for complete understanding, something that has not been achieved in the world of science, and may never be fully attained. We have been able to learn so much about the processes of life, yet there is so much more to learn.

Students must understand the importance of asking why, as a society we must crave information and understanding, a difficult task that sometimes seems unfathomable to the human brain. Once I get my degree I have always wanted to volunteer with Doctors Without Borders, this is one of the major reasons I decided to take this path. I see these doctors doing so much to help the less fortunate and their work really changes lives. They are so needed.

I want to be able to provide this service for as many people as I can. While psychology is appealing, I think the neuroscience major provides a unique opportunity to study how our emotions and behavior is shaped by brain physiology, genetics, and learning. That is how great discoveries.

I think the neuroscience major has done an excellent job of introducing me to the biology of the brain, the history of neuroscience, as well the current state of neuroscience research. It's connected to linear thinking, logic and mathematics. By Olivia Baker. Something I never learned is the difference between theatre spelled "re" and "er. Q: Why did you choose your major s? I also want to travel and interact with different cultures.

DAVIS: I did this kind of thing in high school and when it came time to apply for colleges, I realized it was what I enjoyed doing most. Religion has caused wars, created cultures, and more. In understanding religion, I feel like I will be able to understand the world and people better.

BERKO: In Buddhism, Nirvana isn't a place reached through death but is instead a state achieved through enlightenment, which can sometimes take multiple reincarnations. I also want to travel a lot and do some hands-on work in international development.

Marx spoke about his experience in the industry and how being fired lead to bigger opportunities. This is really a lifechanging moment for me. I will never forget it. Photo courtesy Miami Business School. William McNabb, chairman of Vanguard. Photo courtesy Miami. For a long time, Miami has been known as an international city, a hotspot and a gateway to Latin American countries and the Caribbean.

They aspire to a career in leadership or management. William McNabb speaks to an audience of students, faculty and alumni about Vanguard's core values and strategic positions. A: Orange Umbrella breaks down departmental and educational barriers. It's awesome to gain real-world experience that is impossible to get in any traditional classroom environment.

In class, we learn the theory, but here we learn how it really works. It makes us better prepared for internships and eventual employment out in the real world. Unlike traditional classroom projects, we actually get to see our work come to fruition and get hands-on experience of what it is like to work with clients.

In my year being here, I feel like I know more about the industry, my work and my skill sets than I was able to grasp in my three years at UM. Photo by Mugang Chen. Photo by Max Miller. Rose shows the team how she revamped Orange Umbrella's website to better suit their needs.

Photo by Max Evans. Skilled and creative students gain hands-on agency experience with a multitude of local businesses through the School of Communication-housed Orange Umbrella Consultancy By Olivia Baker. Today it is more than a learning experience. It is also a close-knit group. Orange Umbrella started as a simple idea pursued by five determined individuals.

The group reached a defining moment. Orange Umbrella is a perfect way for students to gain more experience in the workforce while also giving companies a chance to work with creative students who can enhance their company. Divided into three departments, the school of Education and Human development focuses on well-being. Educational and Psychological Studies focuses on emotional health, Kinesiology focuses on physical health, and Teaching and Learning focuses on intellectual development.

Supported by funds from the Teagle Foundation, this project was created to explore the Miami Community through the lens of public history, media and social change. Throughout the academic year, Miami Breakthrough brings young students to campus, which provides curriculum development for UM students and faculty.

Students from a collaborating school participates in a semester long course with a final project. In partnership with the Athletic Training Program, the project aims to increase concussion awareness and improve sport safety. The project has observed the impact of concussions in high school athletes and the measures taken by high schools to prevent it. In partnership with Booker T. Washington Senior High School, the Inspire U Academy is a developmental peer mentoring program for high school students with college aspirations.

With on-campus events, college preparation activities and student led workshops, the program provides high school students with access to to dedicated mentors. IF Club - Imagine the Future This project aims to help middle school students develop digital skills, learn STEM practices and form creative habits by engaging in multimedia science fictions.

Jean-Pierre Bardet. Photo by CoE. Emphasizing the collaborative aspect, the lab will support joint research, materials. The metal printers will allow students and faculty to think outside of the lines. Using the lab, he created a full working electric guitar. To complete such research, the SRC team works to tag sharks and track their movements. For example, in , the team the SRC team successfully tagged a total of sharks and brought over 1, citizen scientists, 1, of who were students, out on research vessels to learn about local conservation issues.

A core component of their work is to foster scientific literacy and environmental ethic in youth and the public by providing exciting hands-on field research experiences in marine conservation biology. Q: How did you become a photographer for SRC? I was fortunate to have some experienced photographers on the trip and they helped me to learn how to shoot manual and develop an eye for photography.

After the trip, the lab manager told me that he was very impressed both with how I handled myself on the boat and how I helped the Masters student work with the sharks and their blood. He had also taken a look at my Instagram and he had a need for media interns. I was fortunate enough that he found me a spot for this academic year and I've been tagging ever since!

Q: Do you ever shark tag yourself? A: Yes! All of our media interns are shark tagging interns as well. I mostly. The physiology position draws blood from the sharks and works with the blood in our on-boat laboratory. Q: How many trips have you been on? The program was originally developed and is currently directed by a professor at the University of Miami, Dr.

Neil Hammerschlag. Submissions came from 20 countries and 15 states in the US. Awards are given in four categories: macro, fish or marine animal portrait, wide angle and best overall. To be eligible for the contest, participants must be an amateur photographer earning no more than 20 percent of their income from photography.

The contest also recognizes the best UM student photo, which was awarded to marine mammal science graduate student Drew Martin who photographed a school of eagle rays near Virginia Key, Florida. In the typical classroom experience, there is often a lack of engaging science education opportunities that inspire youth to learn STEM skills and adopt conservation attitudes and behaviors, and a lack of knowledge and awareness about marine ecology and conservation, particularly in relation to shark species.

To address these various challenges, Hammerschlag and the SRC team engage in numerous activities including community outreach, marine-based field, lab, and virtual research experiences and online educational activities. The photo won first place in the student category. Photo by Drew Martin. Photo by Helmut Tollmann. Members of the Recording Academy recognize Frost School of Music musicians at the 60th Grammy Awards with a total of six nominations and one win in multiple categories.

Regardless of major, students can perform with many cross-genre ensembles and broaden their musical horizons. Photo by Mackenzie Karbon. Photo by Colin McKinley. Photo by Mackeznie Karbon. The Simulation Hospital includes four new and improved facilities to help in this. With a total of five floors, each one has a different section. It includes an auditorium, which serves as a venue to hold conferences, seminars and courses; a series of operating rooms to allow students to practice life-or-death situations;.

It looks exactly how the unit would at an actual hospital, which is a great way to learn about the unit and the machines that are being used, especially since I want to work in the ICU setting. Photo by Christian Elledge. After three and a half years of medical school, students in the Miller School of Medicine find out where they're heading for their residency By Alize Ramirez-Canas. On the table was their future in a small envelope. With a second countdown and large amount of confetti, the students ripped open the envelopes and celebrated their residency acceptances.

Among the students celebrating was Ahmed Al Bayati, who was accepted at Vanderbilt for a residency in general surgery. His goal is to become a surgical oncologist, which stems from cancer in his family and his mentors at the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center.

One of those students is Erica Graff, a South Florida native who will be attending Jackson for her residency in internal medicine. The envelopes on the table will determine where they spend their residency. Photo by Jorge Perez.

Both students are going to medical schools in Texas to complete their residencies in pediatrics. Photo by Gustavo Freundt. Law students take their knowledge from the classroom to the courtroom through different outlets offered by the UM School of Law By Alize Ramirez-Canas. Papy, Jr. Moot Court Board is a student run organization that recruits and trains oral and written advocates.

The board is selected from the top 25 students in their second year. The board competes in 15 competitions throughout the year where students have to advocate for or against a topic. Two students from the board goes to the competition while the rest of the team prepares for the next one. The organization won first place at the regional 11th Circuit Bankruptcy competition for the Cristol, Kahn, and Paskay Cup. One of the members, 3L J.

Dan Halperin, also won Best Oralist. Students in the program travel around the world to represent UM in various competitions while obtaining course credit. In a typical competition, students analyze the problem, identify the legal issues, research, write briefs and orally present it to the moot course, giving them the opportunity to to learn how to litigate a case.

Students make a year-long commitment to the team and the class. During their class time, they are taught concepts in international law, research skills, oral advocacy skills and strategies in mooting. Kira Kuhnert. Photo by Kira Kunhert. The organization works to provide justice to those who lack access to legal services due to poverty. Photo by Brittany Thomas. When 3L Brittany Thomas came to Miami, she dove right in and took advantage of what the school had to offer and started serving the Environmental Justice Clinic, which provides advocacy and transactional assistance to low-income communities.

This past year, she split her time between social justice work in Miami and legal aid in New York. Her main focus was the Community Justice Project in Miami, which aims to give low-income communities of color more power.

It is really the best thing. Photo by Mackenzie D'Andrea. To bolster their resumes and discover career possibilities, 'Canes interned all over the country. The program also caters to students from Coral Gables High in an effort to enhance the local education system. Photo by Anthony Callan. Photo by Kelly Zahnen.

Photo by Jolie Starr. Q: Where did you intern? Q: What was your position and what did you do? A: Aquarist intern. I did Tropical saltwater, Cold marine, and Tropical freshwater tank maintenance and daily tasks like feeding and water quality. I also worked with our Penguin colony, doing husbandry, feedings, and enclosure cleanings. Photo by Luis Gonzalez. Photo by Mitchell Fuccile. Photo by Marion Vilberg. Photo by Stephanie Ruffolo. Photo courtesy Lauren Ayars.

Photo courtesy Michelle Inglis. Photo courtesy Emily Greaves. Photo courtesy Kristen Onorato. Photo courtesy Ashley Brooks. Students who purchased a Class of glass were able to enjoy a free beer. As part of an annual tradition, graduating seniors were sent off by the university as the spring semester wrapped up. Featuring different events, food, and activities, seniors had the chance to enjoy their last hoorah before walking across the graduation stage.

The vendors present helped seniors figure out post-grad plans, select a class ring and apply to graduate school. With a Photo Booth, Happy Hour food and drinks, and a visit from Sebastian the Ibis, Seniors could enjoy one last happy hour before the Rat closed for the semester. Over 4, 'Canes graduated in the Watsco Center for the fall and spring graduations. In the fall, commencement ceremonies were held in a single day and took place before the end of the semester due to disruptions in the academic calendar by Hurricane Irma.

The largest undergraduate ceremony boasted students from the College of Arts and Sciences as well as Continuing Studies. Six honorary degrees were granted. Sharpo and Mario Vargas Llosa. LaSalle D. Leffal Jr. The end of the fall and spring semesters is a time to celebrate the graduates from 11 schools and colleges with distinctions ranging from Bachelors to PhDs. Merrick Fountain and the Bunty Cesarano Fountain are popular choices.

Don't forget to pop champagne! With Sebastian If you can't swing this one, the Sebastian statue outside of the Newman Alumni Center is a great stand-in. Led by faculty members, the graduates are led to their seats and await the beginning of the ceremony.

This is what put Miami on the map, this is why fans yell 'Go 'Canes! Miami game where Miami won The team also played in the Orange Bowl. They made the NCAA tournament for the fourth straight season. Miami Athletics and standout student athletes stayed winning on and off the court Information provided by Hurricane Athletics. A chain reaction of turnovers led the team to a game winning streak and some new bling By Madison George.

The chain even had a personal security escort on its way from the jewelry store to the Coral Gables campus. Defensive coordinator Manny Diaz wanted something to entice and reward players during the game which was how the idea of the turnover chain was born. The chain was used as an incentive for players and made its debut during the first game of the season when Miami took on Bethune-Cookman which ended in a Hurricane win.

The turnover chain was a new Miami football tradition and a sign of school spirit with a hint of swag. By the end of the season, the Turnover Chain was only worn 29 times, and cornerback Malek Young was the first player to be honored with the chain after intercepting a pass early on in the fourth quarter against Bethune-Cookman.

Players and fans weren't the only ones rocking the turnover chain, Sebastian the Ibis had his own chain that he would wear during games as well. The chain brought a new sense of swagger and energy to the team and reinvigorated the fanbase. Miami took charge and made big plays early on that led them to winning the ACC opener against Duke, Playing on the road, the Hurricanes were able to score 14 points in the first quarter and took control on both sides of the ball. Quarterback Malik Rosier hit running back Mark Walton for a yard gain that set up a yard connection to wide receiver Braxton Berrios for the game's first points.

Berrios became the first Hurricane to catch a touchdown pass in all of the first three games of a season since Andre Johnson. Rosier finished the game with passing yards, two passing touchdowns and a rushing touchdown. After collecting an interception, linebacker Michael Pinckney was honored with the turnover chain, a new piece of Miami swagger.

The Blue Devils struggled to find a rhythm all game; Pinckney had a solid performance with 10 tackles, an interception, and a sack in the first quarter that stopped a potential scoring drive. With less than five minutes left on the clock, defensive lineman Pat Bethel forced a fumble that was recovered at the Duke yard line and helped seal the victory. After a dominating performance against Duke, the team prepared to take on their in-state rival, FSU.

Photo courtesy Hurricane Athletics. The Mobile, Alabama native led the No. Rosier ranked fifth in the ACC in passing efficiency, and was added to the watch list for the Manning Award, honoring the nation's top quarterback. Rosier became the first Hurricane quarterback since Brock Berlin in to begin his career with a perfect record as starting quarterback.

By Izabella Felpeto. Victory on tribe territory was all the rage, as Miami prevailed against longtime rival, Florida State. Things began to heat up late in the fourth-quarter, following a quiet first three quarters of the game. The Seminoles took the lead , when Florida State quarterback James Blackman connected with Auden Tate for a touchdown with left in the fourth-quarter. With six seconds left, a yard completion from quarterback Malik Rosier to Darrell Langham brought home the win.

After a careful review of the touchdown, officials decided he broke the plane of the goal line before his knee touched the ground a half-yard short. Rosier led the team to victory and completed 19 of 44 passes for yards, three touchdowns and an interception. The defense held tough, as well, for much of the game, with four sacks, nine tackles for loss and interceptions by cornerbacks Michael Jackson and Dee Delaney.

Berrios scored two touchdowns, secured two first downs on the final drive and returned a punt of for 44 yards. After seven straight losses and a postponement due to Hurricane Irma, the 'Canes were finally able to knock off the Seminoles in their own stadium. The win was a sight for sore eyes for the university and fans who were tired of being called "baby brother" by Florida State.

His highlight of this game was making a 31yard field goal. Image courtesy of Hurricane Athletics. BB-8 Wide receiver Braxton Berrios 8 celebrates his first touchdown of the game. This was one of two receiving touchdowns. Photo courtesy of UM Athletics. Deejay totaled 12 carries for 53 yards. November 6, just two days after defeating Virginia Tech and a mere five before playing then-No. Malik had just seen his father after the Virginia Tech game and said he felt fine. You have to take account of the people that are in your life and don't take them for granted.

None of which were more important than Malik knowing his father was going to be ok. After calling his father after the victory Malik said, "it was just nice to hear his voice. Going into the ACC Championship, the Hurricanes were with their first lost of the season coming from the away game against the Pittsburgh Panthers with a final score of This was a big game for Miami. However, the Tigers showed they had something to prove by entering the game with a play, yard scoring drive that ended in a four-yard touchdown run by Travis Etienne.

Only five minutes into the game and the Tigers were up Photo courtesy Hurricanes Athletics. By the third quarter the Tigers were in the lead Going into the game, they were without their best running back, receiver and tight end. Despite totaling yards, it was not enough to pull ahead of Clemson. With a final score of , the loss showed there is still work to do. However, looking at the regular season as whole, it is arguably the best season Miami has had in a while. The stadium holds 75, seats, and UM sold all of their tickets.

Homer made the first touchdown of the game with a five-yard run. The 'Canes return to their home turf against Wisconsin for the Capital One Orange Bowl in their first appearance in the bowl since Grossman finished in 43rd place with a time of Kuck finished in the top 30 with a personal recordbreaking time of After a streak of wins, the women's volleyball team ends their season in Gainesville with 22 wins in their pocket By Izabella Felpeto. The 'Canes closed out the campaign with a.

The last three weeks of this season were the best for us as a team. These kids just always want to improve and learn with weeks and days left in the season. The team rebounded from a tough first-set loss to go into the intermission on level terms. They were a point away from forcing extra points in the fourth set, but the second-seeded Gators closed out the match at , , , Senior outside hitter Olga Strantzali and senior libero Sylvia Hernandez capped off their Miami careers with team-high 20 kills and 15 digs, respectively.

Strantzali earned kills in the last season, leading the ACC with 4. They were just great. Bird had a total of two assists and the 'Canes won Photo courtesy UM Athletics. This was Templeton's first year recognized. With 4. Strantzali also broke the school record for most points scored in a match with 33 against Louisville early in the season.

They know their load and their responsibilities. She made two blocks and seven kills throughout the game. I believe next year that we're going to be in a place where we're going to be really successful. Despite the loss, the team continues to bounce back and fight harder for the coming seasons.

Photo courtesy of. Savage saw a total of minutes of action throughout the season. Photo courtesty UM Athletics. Taking their talents to Greensboro, North Carolina, freshman Zach Cooper and redshirt sophomore David Dinsmore took charge of the platform, having the top two finishes. NCAA national champion, Dinsmore finished with Freshman Annie Kyriakidis set a school record finishing the yard breaststroke in Redshirt freshman Alicia Blagg took home a gold medal after winning the 3-meter spring broad and senior Wally Layland took home a silver medal coming in second.

The team also competed at the World Championships. Hajkova even holds the Slovakian national record for the meter backstroke. The final score was , Miami for the win. UM introduced a new program called Citi 'Canes, a program designed to prepare student athletes for post-grad life. Participants are paired with a mentor as they are introduced to the corporate world. Trying to keep up with the demand of being a full-time student can make it challenging when it comes time to start looking for a job.

As Stowell continues to be a 'Cane on the court, he has accepted a position as an analyst in the Treasury and Trade department at Citi. He can now focus on finishing the semester off and helping his team have a successful season. Before he came to Miami to join the Hurricanes, freshman Lonnie Walker IV had already racked up a lengthy list of accomplishments. Walker led his high school team to its first state championship and was an all-time leading scorer. Averaging 18 points per game, Walker ended his high school career with a total of 1, points.

The 6-footinch guard with a 6-footinch wingspan, chose to attend UM over Arizona, Kentucky, Villanova and Syracuse. Walker was one of the most sought out players Miami acquired in quite some time. Walker made his college debut as a Miami Hurricane during their season opener against Gardner-Webb University where he scored 10 points.

The Men's Basketball team catches fire during the second half of their season opener and prepares to take on the NCAA championships. Ten points. Eleven rebounds. Ten assists. That was the stat line of sophomore guard Bruce Brown Jr. Gardner-Webb scored the first seven points of the game until Miami made it onto the board four minutes into the game. During the second half, the team had a much better.

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In fact, the student can choose from two types of tasks: those belonging to the outer fringe, and those belonging to the inner fringe of the student's knowledge state. The outer fringe consists of new activities, not practiced before, for which the student masters all prerequisite items new items ready to learn.

The inner fringe consists of items the student has practiced before, but for which the mastery level is estimated as less than complete items suggested for review. The ALEKS assessment module starts with an entry assessment in order to evaluate precisely a student's knowledge state for the given domain e. Business Statistics. Following this assessment, ALEKS delivers a graphic report analyzing the student's knowledge within all curricular areas for the course, based on specified standards.

The report also recommends concepts on which the student can begin working; by clicking on any of these concepts or items the student gains access to the learning module. All problems of the assessment module are algorithmically generated, and require that the student produce authentic input see Figure 1 for a sample assessment item. The assessment is adaptive: the choice of each new question is based on the aggregate of responses to all previous questions.

As a result, the student's knowledge state can be found by asking only a small subset of the possible questions typically Assessment results are always framed relative to specified educational standards that can be customized with a syllabus editor part of the instructor module.

Both the assessment and learning modules are automatically adapted to the chosen standards. The learning report, of which Figure 2 shows a part, provides a detailed, graphic representation of the student's knowledge state by means of pie-charts divided into slices, each of which corresponds to an area of the syllabus. In the ALEKS system, the student's progress is shown by the proportion of the slice that is filled in by solid color.

Also, as the mouse is held over a given slice, a list is displayed of items within that area that the student is currently 'ready to learn', as determined by the assessment. For example, Ina has completed four from eight slices in Business Statistics.

Ina can choose to start fulfilling the eleven lessons about inferences, eight about regression, twelve about ANOVA or 10 about Time series. At the conclusion of the assessment ALEKS determines the concepts that the student is currently ready to learn, based on that student's current knowledge state.

These new concepts are listed in the report, and the learning mode is initiated by clicking on any highlighted phrase representing a concept in the list. The focus of the learning mode is a sequence of problems to be solved by the student, representing a series of concepts to be mastered. Setting an participantsParticipants in this study were first year university students in two programs based on the principle of problem-based learning: International Economics and International Business Studies.

The methods course is supported by 'practicals'. Those for statistics are based on the e-learning environment ALEKS, and allow for the measurement of user intensity operationalized as the number of connect hours into the system. Therefore, data on practicals are not representative for students' learning efforts in the whole course. Vermunt distinguishes in his learning styles model four domains or components of learning: cognitive processing strategies, metacognitive regulation strategies, learning conceptions or mental models of learning, and learning orientations.

Each component is composed of five different scales. The two processing strategies Relating and structuring and Critical processing together compose the 'deep learning' strategy, whereas Memorizing and rehearsing, together with Analysing, compose the 'stepwise learning' strategy also called surface learning in several theories of learning. The fifth processing strategy is Concrete learning. Similarly, the two regulation scales Self-regulation of learning processes and Selfregulation of learning content together compose the strategy 'self-regulation', hypothesised to be prevalent in deep learning students.

The two regulation scales External regulation of learning processes and External regulation of learning results constitute the 'external regulation' strategy, supposed to be characteristic for stepwise learners. The fifth regulation strategy signals absence of regulation: 'Lack of regulation'. In addition to the ILS, attitudes or achievement motivations toward the subject statistics based on Eccles' expectancy-value theory Eccles, ;Eccles, Adler, Rutterman, Goff, Kaczala et al.

Expectancy-value models take their name from the key role of two components in the motivation to perform on an achievement task: students' expectancies for success, and the task value, that is the value they attribute to succeeding the task. The SATS instrument measures four aspects of post-secondary students' subject attitudes: two expectancy factors that deal with students' beliefs about their own ability and perceived task difficulty: Cognitive competence and Difficulty, and two subjective task-value constructs that encompass students' feelings toward and attitudes about the value of the subject: Affect and Value.

Validation research has shown that a four-factor structure provides a good description of responses to the SATS-instrument in two very large samples of undergraduate students Dauphinee et al. Subsequently, the adequacy of the SATS-instrument for measuring achievement motivations for business subjects has been demonstrated in. Recently, the instrument is incremented by two more attitudes scales: Interest and Effort, where the last scale represents the willingness of the student to invest time and other efforts in learning the subject.

The naming of the Difficulty scale is somewhat counterintuitive, since in contrast to all other scales, lower scores and not higher scores correspond to higher levels of conceived difficulty. Therefore, the scale is mostly addressed with 'lack of Difficulty' in the next sections.

A third group of students' background factors is based upon Dweck's self-theory of intelligence and goal orientations. Dweck's self-theory of intelligence distinguishes two polar types of student beliefs: Entity Theory, the view that intelligence is something one can't change much, and Incremental Theory, the belief that intelligence can be increased through effort and persistence. Dweck demonstrated that students with the first view are stronger mastery than performance oriented, as opposed to students with the second view.

Profiles with regard to these achievement goals will be measured by the Grant and Dweck inventory. That instrument distinguishes six goal types: outcome, ability, normative outcome, normative ability, learning, and challenge-mastery. The last piece of information making up students' profiles is based on Baron-Cohen's empathizing-systemizing E-S theory.

Beyond performance in the e-tool connect time 'HoursALEKS' and final mastery 'MasteryALEKS' , course performance indicators are available, achieved with different assessment instruments being part of the course performance portfolio: quizzes in statistics StatsQz , and the score in the final written exam StatsExam. ResultsOn average, students spend In this amount of time spend on e-learning, students achieve an average mastery level of The adaptive entry test the ALEKS module starts with determines the entry point of any student in the module.

Also the first performance indicator, the score in the quizzes, is strongly related to two other e-tool indicators, and especially mastery in ALEKS: quizzes are administered in the ALEKS-tool, and quiz items correspond to practice items. The second performance indicator, score in the exam, is quite unrelated to the e-tool.

For all four outcome variables, multiple regression models are estimated using all scales making up the student profiles as explanatory variables. Table 1 contains the beta's, the standardized regression coefficients, of these models, with in the last row the percentage of explained variation R 2. In the top of the table, three indicator variables are included: Gender indicating female students , Dutch secondary education, and Math at advanced level in secondary education.

The Gender dummy is nowhere significant. That is an expected outcome, in fact even the prime reason to introduce the e-tool: Dutch secondary math education is very different from math education in many European countries, with a large share of teaching time devoted to statistical topics.

For that reason, the use of the e-tool is not much added value for students educated in the Dutch system, explaining the large negative beta's in the equations explaining hours of use and mastery. A similar, but much weaker role is played by the dummy variable MathMajor: students from these advanced tracks may both have more prior knowledge, and more talents, making them less dependent on the use of the e-tool. Other important predictors of connect time are the goal orientation Learning Goal, the ambition to acquire new knowledge and skills also called mastery orientation , and Effort Planned: the willingness to invest a lot of efforts, and certainly time, in one's study.

The outcome variable that is most unrelated to the use of the e-tool is the score in the final exam: StatsExam. Its main predictors are first the MathMajor dummy, next two attitudes scales Cognitive Competence and Value, and Critical Processing, the most outspoken aspect of deep learning. Amongst the goal orientations, it is the Ability Goal, striving for good performance with a nonnormative goal, that best predicts this achievement measure.

Like connect time, the dummy indicating Dutch secondary education has a strong negative impact. But learning approaches act more similar as in the score in the exam, as do subject attitudes besides planned effort. Discussion and conclusionStudents investigated in this empirical study learn statistics in a blended learning environment that allows them to adapt the use of different learning resources according to personal preferences and dispositions.

It appears that differences in learning dispositions and achievement motivations or subject attitudes account for a substantial part of the variation observed in the intensity of using e-learning. But that is as well true for course performance indicators. When contrasting the four regression models, some striking differences show up. That pattern was the mere reason to introduce the e-learning tool: aimed at students with no or few prior schooling, it is no surprise that these students use the tool more frequently, but still not completely bridge the gap in knowledge caused by prior education differences.

Apparently, the e-tool does not discriminate between different profiles of learners with regard to learning approaches, and in this way is especially helpful for the more surface oriented learners. In contrast, the best goal predictor of exam score is AbilityGoal, the aim to validate one's ability or avoid demonstrating a lack of ability.

A strong learning or mastery orientation is a must to be successful in the e-tool, but no guarantee for success in the exam. This profile deviates from the profile of academically successful students, for whom Affect and Cognitive Competence stand out most, not the willingness to do a lot of studying. The picture that emerges of the intensive e-learner is that of a learner aware of her or his lack of knowledge, being learning goal oriented, willing to invest a lot in remediating this shortage, and having an orientation toward external regulation.

Some of these differences in the profiles between e-learners and academically successful students might be an artifact of a drawback of this study: the fact that the observation of learning intensity is one-sided, in that we were able to measure the intensity of studying with the e-learning tool, but not the intensity of using other components of the blended learning environment. Therefore, one cannot totally exclude the possibility that e-learners not only use the e-tool with higher intensity than other students, but do so for all components of the blended learning environment.

However, given the strong correspondence between the principles on which the e-learning tool ALEKS is based, and the type of learning dispositions of these e-learners, it is highly plausible that the e-tool is of greatest support to students of this specific profile.

So although accommodation of individual differences should not go at the cost of the ultimate goal of raising students to the desired level of self-regulated deep learners, the availability of a blended learning environment encompassing different components that are able to support different types of learners seems of great value, especially in difficult service courses as statistics. The main contribution of this work is to analyze the classroom as a place where small working teams work and learn together and co-construct knowledge.

We propose that the transfer of knowledge between students occurs not only through the work they are doing in their small teams but also through the activities all teams actively share in the larger physical and virtual classroom.

These inter-team relations should reinforce the sociocognitive processes taking place inside each working team. So, the social learning space will reinforce each team's socio-cognitive factors and create a knowledge-sharing environment that will improve learning.

Main goal of researchThe main goal of this research is to understand intra-and intergroup learning behaviour in a blended learning environment. Small working teams construct shared knowledge and try to reach successful collaboration in their social learning space. Collaborative learning environments enrich learning through interaction and therefore obtain better performance on the ascribed tasks than traditional learning environments.

However, research in CSCL and collaborative learning in general shows that the potential effectiveness of group learning is not always reached e. The cognitive perspective stresses the influence of team work on cognitive processes. The social perspective examines the social factors constituting successful performance in team work. So, conceptualizing learning in collaboration has to entail both of them; an understanding of how socio-cognitive processes give rise to cognitive development and an understanding of the social, interpersonal dimension of teamwork.

This means that the identification of the social conditions under which teams make this effort to reach shared knowledge is an essential prerequisite for developing enhanced understanding of successful collaboration. As Van den Bossche, et Al. In other words, Van den Bossche et al. The team learning model specifies when and how teams in collaborative learning environments engage in building and maintaining mutually shared cognition, also referred to as shared mental model Van den Bossche et al.

Research on shared mental models has highlighted that team who develop a shared mental model perform superior than other teams Van den Bossche et al. This paper presents an integrative perspective, building on the strengths of different research strands. It includes both the learning behaviour of the team and conditions in the interpersonal context that contribute to engagement in the development of mutually shared cognition practices.

So, the learning behaviours that positively influence the development of this mutually shared cognition are the co-construction of meaning and the constructive conflict in the interaction of the team. Besides, this research focuses in the beliefs about the interpersonal context which influence this team learning behaviour. The group-level beliefs that potentially affect the learning behaviour are psychological safety, cohesion, potency and interdependence.

Thus, this research states that "the identification of the social conditions under which teams make the effort to reach shared knowledge is an essential prerequisite for developing enhanced understanding of successful collaboration" Van den Bossche et al. But, as Webb and Palincsar noted, few researchers have investigated these kinds of social factors that influence team learning in educational settings.

Proposition 1: Effective teams are able to create the right social and cognitive environment, fostering the development of a shared mental model. Learning inside and across teams: a common learning spaceThe socio-cognitive processes through which members of a team collaborate in class do not occur in a vacuum but are influenced by the social context in which they take place Keyton, The social context affects the certain learning space: a place where the agents in the learning process, teachers and students, are together; in a collaborative classroom which nourishes the willingness to engage in the joint effort to build and maintain mutually shared cognition Barron, ;Crook, Within educational psychology, limited research has been conducted in order to assess whether sub teams in a classroomsetting also learn from the experiences of other teams in their class and what the underlying mechanisms for these learning spaces are.

However, this capacity of a space to improve agent's outcomes is well studied for firms and its innovation process, in a stream of literature related with regional economics. This strand of research can provide insights to study learning across teams.

However, the empirical results of these studies identified small firms as much more innovative than bigger ones. These contrasting results underlined the need for introducing other explanatory variables vital for fostering the innovation process. These external factors are named "knowledge spillovers" and refer to positive influences that firms received in terms of knowledge from the environment in which they operate.

As Gerosky underlines, the proximity to other firms can be essential in increasing the innovation capacity of a firm independently of internal firm characteristics. There is an agreement in literature on the fact that physical proximity among firms plays a crucial role in improving their innovative capacity. Space matters because of the existence of knowledge spillovers but this space is not only physical but also made of all the different relationships built among local actors.

This cultural proximity is the basis for the existence of explicit and implicit cooperation among actors and public and private partnership. The main contribution of the present study is to combine the findings of shared mental models in team-based research with the concepts of knowledge spillovers between learners, which are drawn from research on regional economics.

In other words, we want to offer a theoretical framework to analyze the classroom as the place where small working teams develop their social and learning exchanges. Team 1 consists of five members who learn and work together on several tasks, which is represented by the five actors and their links. In order to effectively learn from each other, the five members of the team have to focus on both the cognitive and social processes in order to develop a shared mental model Barron, ;Van den Bossche et al.

Teams who effectively establish a shared mental model are illustrated by the circle around each team in Figure 1. The new element in our research is that teams not necessarily learn in isolation in a classroom. In fact, learners in a classroom naturally interact or link with their peers outside their team, which might lead to knowledge spillovers from Team 1 to Team 2 or to Team n.

These inter-team relations, based on daily personal contact and learning interaction should reinforce the socio-cognitive processes taking place inside each working team. We propose that the transfer of knowledge between students occurs not only through the work they are doing in their small teams but also through the activities all teams actively shared in the classroom.

So, we argue that the social and learning space in a classroom is able to reinforce each team's socio-cognitive factors and is able to create a knowledge-sharing environment that will improve learning. Figure 1: Shared Mental Model and Knowledge SpilloverProposition 2: In addition to interacting within a team, learners are also interacting with other learners outside their team, which will enhance knowledge spillovers across teams.

One of the main assumed advantages of using ICT in education is that learners can learn in a flexible and challenging manner. In addition, the developments of ICT in the last years are so rapid that currently several ICT tools offering rich blended classrooms can be used by teachers and students to learn in a challenging and interactive manner Cho, ;Hurme et al.

For example, at Maastricht University in a course E-business and E-Economics students were assisted in their learning process when they were not physically at the university by using discussion forums. Students in the intervention cohort were more satisfied with their learning processes than students who did not use discussion forums.

As a result, in Figure 2 the integration of the blended learning space with the face-to-face learning space is illustrated. Figure 2: Shared Mental Model and Knowledge Spillover in a blended learning environmentProposition 3: Extending the learning space from a face-to-face environment to a blended learning environment will lead to more knowledge spillovers.

Proposition 4: The extent to which teams use the online settings for knowledge construction is explained by the degree in which teams have developed a shared mental model SettingIn the near future, a study is conducted to test the above formulated proposition. This study takes place in an elective 3rd year course of Business Administration in the Economics Faculty at University of Oviedo.

The aim of this course is to introduce students in international economic relations. The participants are between Spanish and Erasmus students enrolled in this course. The students are assumed to meet twice a week, in two-hour session, during 14 weeks period. The course uses a blended learning approach with collaborative learning methodology, combining whole class work with team work. The working teams have to solve five authentic tasks related with international economics.

These working teams consist of five members, who are self-selected by the students themselves. The instructional design offers the teams several opportunities to share knowledge. Intra-and inter-team interaction tools have been planned both in the face-to-face and in the online environment.

Table 1 summarize the elements of the instructional design that promote the different types of teams' interactions. Class time devoted to whole class work: presentations, discussions, analysis and assessment of other teams' products… Task-specific forum to discuss about tasks and analyse and assess other teams' products. Feedback and corrections through the forum In the face-to-face setting, during the class time, each team could reach mutually shared cognition in the moments devoted to team work, when the teams work on their own on the different tasks.

The interteam exchanges in the face-to-face setting could happen in the moments devoted to whole class work: presentations, discussions, questions asking and answering, analysis and assessment of other teams' products…Besides the face-to-face, the online environment serves as support and collaboration tool for teams working.

The intra-team interaction in the VLE is canalized through team private forum and Wikis. Some tasks are provided with a Wiki so teams can collaborative writing assigned papers or presentations. The use of a wiki tool is a big help to introduce comments and corrections about a work in process and assist teams in their co-construction processes. The learning across teams in the VLE is promoted through task-specific fora. These are general fora where all team members can participate and make possible to discuss about the different tasks, ask doubts and propose solutions and share information between teams.

This design tries to resemble the face-to-face setting, where there are moments for collaborative teams to work on their own and moments for the whole class to work all together see figure 2. The online tools are also an important element to provide feedback. So, electronic means of communication available on the VLE are used to return corrections and comments both about the final quality of the products but also about the discussion and construction process.

Thus, special emphasis is placed by the teacher on ways to improve the tasks, focusing on process rather on content. Once the tasks are finished all working teams can analysed the products from the other classmates both by presentations to the whole class and through the VLE. So, each working team elaborates and actively construct their knowledge in the face-to face sessions and in the VLE. Normally the assigned activities are presented, explained and began in the physical classroom and then continued through the online tools.

During all type of interactions, students are supposed to actively construct knowledge together in collaboration and both settings become the common learning space for all teams. Blended learning, blended ideas -collaboration vs. The role of collaboration and self-learning in this kind of learning methodology is still a subject of theoretical and empirical studies. This paper will present the question of collaborative learning in blended learning and, in general terms, ICT supported course.

Starting from theoretical deliberations, the text will focus on the researches conducted in frame of two European projects. We would like to present lessons learned from two kinds of ICT supported courses: for students and for teachers. These courses show that collaborative learning can be seen as a subject to be studied and at the same time constitutes the way the course participants are learning.

Finally, we would like to present the outcomes of the second project research on collaborative blended learning while trying to design effective ICT supported remedial course. Theoretical approaches to blended learningIn fact, there are a lot of definitions and approaches describing what blended learning is. Therefore, the term "blended learning" concerns both pedagogical approach, learning methods, using media, technology and relations between all of them, bearing in mind what to learn Gynther, Thus, blended learning is a term multidimensional and with wide number of meanings.

However, the clearest and the most popular of all these definitions is blended learning as a kind of learning method combining face-to-face classes and e-learning. Because it is not a pure e-learning, there is an opportunity to eliminate the defects which many of the educational researchers underline in pure elearning.

Likewise, not being a pure face-to-face traditional learning -blended learning let us take all the best from this kind of learning, minimizing its negative aspects. Obviously, the important question is still how to mix these two approaches techniques, methodologies in order to obtain effective course or training -what should be the content of the curriculum, which part of this content should be performed in a traditional way and which one with ICT support, finally -what ICT techniques and tools should be used.

Having these problems in mind, blended learning allows maximization of the course effectiveness by matching the best methodology for each of the course parts. For example, blended learning course designer should remember that typical face-to-face classes are suited for workshops, coaching, exercises, feedback on activities and paper-based tests moreover, in each learning situation where social interaction and the dialogue between a student and a teacher are needed. In turn "live" e-learning is good for application exercises, online coaching, interaction between students, online feedback, assessment, chats and instant messaging.

What is concerned self-paced e-learning goes for simulations, online case studies, interactive learning modules, e-mail, bulletin boards interactions, online assessments, and other forms of computer based training Harriman, The table presents another possible matching between activities and methods in a blended learning course. Undeniable advantages of blended learning are not only varied possibilities of combining and personal adaptation of pedagogical methods but also some specific benefits resulting both from implementing ICT support and face-to-face approaches.

There are three basic assets of using online methods in blended learning course listed in the subject literature: cost reduction especially the parts of the course realized online, personal costs related to the presence and mobility of teachers, rental costs, etc. Taking into consideration face-to-face learning, the benefits are possibilities to take social interaction, live collaboration and the dialogue between a student and a teacher.

Collaborative learning as an element of ICT supported courseWhat is a place of collaboration in ICT supported learning, named also blended learning? To answer this question, it is worth to think about using collaboration tools in both ICT-based and traditional face-to face learning. It seems that collaboration is one of the most important factors of learning, often listed with communication. In face-to face learning collaboration is a main part of didactical process.

Primarily, it is collaboration between a student and teachers, who communicate, discuss and assess each other. In turn, in an online course the collaboration is, of course, an opportunity to have a contact between a tutor and learners but if we consider online self-learning the collaborative learning may also manifests itself in using the collaborations tools as chat, instant messengers, forum or others Web 2.

Therefore, collaborative learning is a crucial part of both kinds of learning. These are: technology, instructors, students, and pedagogy. On the basis of their research, they have defined several factors existing in each field. These factors are important in terms of creation effective and satisfactory blended learning course. But the most important factors common for all areas are: communication, collaboration, and interaction. The figure below visualizes this theory.

Curiously enough, the same research shows that the perceived communication, collaboration, and satisfaction levels of students differ according to their levels of computer and Internet literacy such as level of computer usage, level of the Internet usage, frequency of computer usage, and frequency of the Internet usage. But, what seems to be a problem in terms of students is that they not always recognize how to implement saving ICT informal knowledge in educational context.

What are the main tools of collaboration in online environment? But a special area of using ICT for reinforcing collaboration is assessment and giving feedback in blended learning course. The teacher can benefit from e-mails, dedicated web sites, forums, learning platforms and social sites for giving an immediate feedback and doing an individual as well as group assessment.

What is more, these tools give an opportunity of peer assessment, providing informal feedback on the tasks Enerson et al. In should be underlined that there is still one important point in the collaboration matter: a distinction between collaborative learning and cooperative learning.

In cooperative learning students do the subtasks independently and then provide one, common solution. However, the task division into groups or, rather, roles observer, evaluator, motivator etc. Success stories and lessons learned from the both COMBLE coursesTaking into consideration wide literature review and numerous experiences of different educational institutions, it is worth underlining that the idea of blended learning -generally groundbreaking, up-to-date and prospective -also may cause some problems.

Most often, students are familiar with the Internet and its tools but -as we mentioned above -they often do not have experience in using them in educational context. What also may cause a problem is the need for combining different pedagogical methods and learning activities into face-to-face classes with e-learning.

It is the overall objective of COMBLE project and all its participating partners from three areas of education: higher education, vocational and continuing education, from four countries: Germany, Denmark, Poland and Estonia. Because of this meaningful knowledge gaps in instructional designing or usage of blended learning methods and techniques above mentioned and according to main objectives of the COMBLE project, two different courses were developed and conducted: one for students Blended Learning Driver's License Course and the second one for teachers Blended Learning Expert Course.

This paper will present them in the context of application the collaborative learning as an element of ICT supported course. The first of created courses BLDLC is a typical self-learning course multimedia course with elearning platform support and the second one BLEC uses methodology of collaborative and problem based learning e-learning platform and lectures in Second Life.

Taking into account different needs of these two target groups different methodologies are used in both cases. Collaborative learning in the case of student course is a subject to be learnt and in the second case course for teachers it is the way the participants are learning. Students, as mentioned above, often have problems with applying blended learning tools in the process of learning.

These students who are less familiar with ICT event don't know what the possibilities this technology provides. Thus, course designers decided to prepare self-learning online course which would introduce the students into the world of the tools allowing them to use available online resources to supports the traditional education.

Firstly, students could learn about blended learning in general terms and get to know the definitions. Then, they obtained information about online learning technique, their own learning styles and also about Virtual Learning Environment. The next part of the course dealt with collaboration and communication in blended learning as the main body of this learning methodology.

Collaboration is everything -that was a keyword of this part. Students could find there an explanation of synchronous and asynchronous communication, and then the various tools of communication were presented. Another part of the course concerned social aspects in online supported learning, based on Web 2.

At the end of the course the psychological problems were covered motivation, time management, resources management, searching requested information in online environment. The course and the participants were moderated and guided by the tutor on the Moodle platform where the additional tasks, place for sharing experiences and a final test were put.

The second part concerned collaboration directly. The third part, relevant to the tools of Web 2. Because in fact, what are creation of Wiki, taking part in the social networking sites, exchange of virtual video or voice resources? Here, collaboration is placed in the defined, interactive and open environment where its main sense is accomplished in the social space. Generally the collaboration questions in BLDLC course were assessed well with average 4,5 points in a 5-point scale.

The participants appreciated the course content and its organization. However, the comments like this also appeared: "maybe the curse should be longer and connected with more time of synchronous activities". The importance of collaborative aspects of blended learning possibilities was assessed quite high -between average 4, and 4,75 points.

As the students indicated almost all collaborative aims achieved only the ability to operate and use the six tools of social interaction: blog, virtual gallery, Wiki, You Tube, podcast and social-networking sites gained, on average, less than 4 points -the effectiveness of the course could be classified as high. Knowledge about collaboration in ICT supported learning is really needed and an organized content of the appropriate course came across students expectations.

But the most important technique used in this course was collaboration of all the participants. The collaboration appeared during asynchronous, written communication on the Moodle platform and also during synchronous, oral activities in online world Second Life. As far as SL is concerned, the course took advantage of innovatory forms of cooperation with virtual world offers.

The participants, not having the possibility to interact with each other in real life international teams , could become avatars and participate in a common event in the same place and at the same time. They had an opportunity to run live discussions which was great from the facilitators' perspective, giving a chance for an immediate feedback, quick assessment and appropriate reaction.

It is based on an active participation of learners who are to express their opinion on a given subject by choosing one of the opinions agree, against, neutral, etc. Thus, this exercise is a kind of discussion based on virtual communication and synchronous participation. Whole course lasted 6 weeks, with 9 lectures in SL and many asynchronous discussions on Moodle forums. Participants, divided into national groups, had an objective to fulfill developing a miniproject related to real life and based on PBBL approach.

After finishing the course the participants have evaluated the particular indicators, together with group collaboration and role of the facilitators in the course. Here are a few opinions from this evaluation discussion: I feel connected of course mostly to the danish team but also to the rest of the participants in a way, that I never thought possible after 6 weeks working together only online and never meeting in RL.

I have really learned a lot too. ITo sum up, the lesson learned from this course: the collaboration and communication as a technique used in experts learning is really fruitful and effective during realization of the task based on the PBBL approach. Particularly, it proves not to fulfill the main purpose of the course because from the teacher's perspective the students could learn not "how to" prepare BL course but "what actually is" BL course.

The number of planned activities as SL lectures was too large in relation to quite short duration time. What is more and curiously enough, there were some problems with cultural differences in what is to be considered the standards in working on the projects.

However, the collaboration part of the course leading in an innovative way was a huge success and beside of being a tool for proper task preparation, it turned into an instrument of building the social community. Some of the participants would like to work in international but interest-focused groups.

Others enjoyed national teams as more cultural and language "tolerant". It could constitute an inspiring aspect of another research -if we agree that collaboration is something good in ICT supported course. The question is how to organize people working in the international environment and being at different educational levels and having various needs. Likewise, the opinions about SL as a collaborative milieu were diversified, some of the participants pointed at too little time for asynchronous effective discussions on the platform and too much involvement into virtual meetings.

Suggestions on how to use collaborative learning in remedial courseWe can also benefit from the outcomes of research on collaborative blended learning courses while we try to design effective ICT supported remedial courses in the frame of another European project STEP -Studies on Transitional Electronic Programs.

Remedial courses are specific as their participants very often have different learning needs, competences and different social and educational backgrounds. They are also a challenge for teachers or designers who have to prepare one effective course for participants with a variety of needs. Many remedial courses are supported by ICT. The question which may appears: are collaborative learning tools needed in remedial courses and if so for what?

STEP Project was focused on analyzing of traditional and remedial courses -both real examples of the courses in European countries and world literature concerned the remedial education in general. Four partners in the project -the educational institution from the Netherlands, Belgium, Lithuania, and Polandworked on collected data to choose the best practices and decide how to support remedial courses in the most effective way by ICT methods.

The main aim of the project was to develop a framework of assessing and comparing online supported preparatory transitional programs. One of the actions in STEP project was gathering the empirical data on three levels -first from the partners' institution, then from each partner country institutions and finally from various European institutes. This research was conducted with the use of an online survey consisting of questions regarding didactical and organizational aspects of remedial teaching.

The kind of the learning subject, didactical methods, general objectives of the course and, obviously, ICT support were taken into account. The survey took place between February and May The courses from 65 institutions and from 22 countries were analyzed. One of the crucial parts of the survey was evaluation of collaboration and communication use in remedial courses. Application of this learning method or its elements seems to be very important during transitional programs planning.

Nowadays, we have to deal with a large number of international students within Europe. Their presence on the remedial courses rises increasingly because of necessity to be flexible and open not only on the educational area but also on the dynamic job market. They have to deal with cultural differences, not to mention the dissonances between levels of countries' educational systems.

The involvement in learning course subject by using collaboration methods and tools, especially when they are ICT supported, lets the students not only improve their knowledge but also defeat communication and multicultural problems.

The results of STEP research show that area of collaboration work vs. From courses, 57 were specified as the courses which used collaboration method. Curiously enough, these are the courses concerning language and social disciplines rather than science. This phenomenon could be explained by higher ability of collaboration in social sciences in which education seems to be less formal, less focused on rigid knowledge, more skill-and cooperation-oriented.

In this range of courses, collaboration is possible and expected, as the factor both facilitating the learning process and having value on its own. Another observation from project research is that, the more ICT in remedial courses, the more collaboration. It results from a wide range of possibilities of effective collaboration instruments which are accessible when ICT tools are used.

It should be noticed that collaboration in social "soft" remedial courses does not exclude using individual work, which is also applied in these courses. But it is worth underlining that with the use of blended learning techniques, the use of the individual work is decreased. However, in the global interpretation of the research results, it is evident that collaboration as learning methods or techniques is used in almost all analyzed courses. Only one group of 22 courses from science "hard" area is firmly classified as collaboration free.

It leads to the statement and recommendation that collaboration is needed in remedial courses and is introduced especially if ICT is used. As mentioned above, collaboration not only provides the students with more effective learning of the subjects, but it is also integrated and acculturated in a new social environment faster than the one focused only on an individual work.

Allen, E. Sizing the opportunity: The quality and extent of online education in the United States, and Lifelong learning, an educational tradition, rests on a notion that it is the individual's own choice of pursuit of knowledge, skills and values. However, the continual quest for learning is becoming more significant with the emerging technologies and changing lifestyle. The rapid change in innovations and interventions in the workplace makes it practically impossible for every individual to be "completely trained" in terms of transfer of learning.

Workplace situation is a variable thereby posing different challenges for similar occupations. Thus, the question of choice becomes meaningless as the urgency arises. In this context, lifelong learning becomes critical to complement and supplement existing work-based learning or even primary, secondary and tertiary education.

ReferencesThis study highlights the obstacles in lifelong learning in the local context that can be extrapolated to the global perspective. Qualitative data was obtained through the inspection of policy documents and interviews. The findings showed that the vision for life long learning is well documented in the nation's policies.

The aspects discussed are potential resolutions in facilitating the concept of "education for all and "easy accessibility for all". Democratization of education has been made possible by adopting multiple strategies. The "open entry" system for all citizens in the country to pursue lifelong learning programmes with a nominal and flexible fee structure facilitates the participation from community members.

The wide range of courses offered, with features of customization, recognition and accreditation positions lifelong learning programmes as a "stepping stone" for facilitating development of human capital, social capital and culture capital.

E-portfolio for competence development during internships of teacher education IntroductionPortfolio as a concept originates from the world of arts and architecture. Artists use it as a medium to show a compilation of their best work to promote it to prospective customers. Due to the proliferation in use and of different approaches to portfolio numerous definitions can be found Janssens, Boes and Wante, Based on review of literature on portfolios and research evidence Davies and LeMahieu claim that student choice and ownership are key factors for student motivation.

Meeus and Van Looy b report that, depending on the purpose of the portfolio student choice varies concerning choice of competencies to be proven, choice of formal portfolio aspects and choice of portfolio content. Zeichner and Wray in Van Tartwijk et al, underline the importance of finding a balance between students personal freedom and imposed formal criteria.

The selected artifacts have to meet following criteria: prove the competence level at a particular moment, outline students own further objectives, illustrate how next steps in his growing process will be taken. An individual's learning process can only be made visible through reflection. Korthagen and colleagues in Driessen, defined reflection as the "mental process of trying to structure or restructure an experience, a problem, or existing knowledge or insights" and in line with this definition, they developed a model for cyclic professional development, based on reflection on experience, known as the ALACT model.

Kathpalia and Heah investigated several ways to promote the process of self-reflection by students: defining reflection, modeling, completing reflective statements, reflective prompts, reflection checklist, reflective journals, weblogs. Reflection is not merely an individual and solitary act, on the contrary, it "often includes dialogue and conversation with a coach, a mentor, an adviser, or a peer.

So, coaching students to help them in developing these skills is essential. This shift from a portfolio in a threering-binder to an electronic portfolio is more than just a change in format. As added value, electronic portfolios allow "students to create their own sense of interconnections between artifacts" Norton-Meier, Moreover, Pullman proclaimed that hypertext was a new way of thinking that can lead to a new art-form.

This adds a new feature to the portfolio concept. In addition to this, electronic portfolios are more portable Pullman, , look more sophisticated Pullman, and permit coaching from a distance. E-portfolio is easily accessible Johnson in Lin, and can be accessed from remote locations Strudler and Wetzel, Interaction between students and lectures, students and peers Chang, ;Pullman, , and other possible stakeholders is possible Chang, ;Janssens, et al.

The capacity to store artifacts using different media e. An additional benefit that comes with electronic portfolios is that it offers an opportunity to promote the student's ICT-competence referred to as "media competence" by Meeus, Questier and Derks Students who worked with an electronic portfolio seemed more inclined to integrate ICT in their later teacher practice Lin, Beside these advantages, some obstacles in dealing with this electronic portfolio have been recorded.

Furthermore, constructing an electronic portfolio demands a lot of time for the student due to the handling of different media Meeus et al. Design of the studyThe purpose of this study was to evaluate an implemented e-portfolio in an university teacher education program at K. During one or two years, students are trained to be teachers in secondary education. To enroll in this program a masters degree is required or about to be acquired. The e-portfolio under study has been designed for the purpose of coaching and assessment of preservice teachers during their internship.

During which they are expected to acquire teacher competences. To realize this, student teachers are expected to carry out several tasks during internship in different educational settings. These are partly mandatory and partly free to be chosen from a predesigned set of tasks.

Prior to the internship a Personal Development Plan PDP , to acquire teacher competences, is made up by the student teacher and shared with the course-instructor. It is made up to meet students individual training needs, and consists of all mandatory tasks and a selection of tasks from the predesigned task set.

Students are also encouraged to adapt existing, or suggest new tasks, to suit their own training needs. During, and at the end of their internship, student teachers use this PDP to document their learning process, in acquiring all required competences. As mentioned in Driessen et al. Coaching is provided by a mentor working in the educational setting, and by a course-instructor of the academic teacher education.

For the latter, it involves a role as a coach and supervisor, face to face and on-line. Whereas, the mentors' role is mainly based on face to face feedback. To stimulate student learning process during internship through reflection, the conceptual framework of Korthagen has been chosen as theoretical principle. All stakeholders student, mentor and course-instructor have an active role in the assessment of the preservice teacher.

For this purpose a tool was developed and guidelines for coaching and final assessment were made up. We want to investigate how the recent implementation of an electronic portfolio influences the coaching process of the teacher-students. Tillema and Smith noticed that however much is written about electronic portfolio as alternative assessment instrument, little is known about "how electronic portfolio is evaluated and subsequently used to guide further learning".

We intend to, after this study, give an answer on what actions are performed during the coaching process and assessment of teacher-students, what difficulties are encountered and how this process can be optimized. Different stakeholders will be consulted in this study: students, mentors and course-instructors. This paper presents data gathered of the course-instructors. Research questions1. What was the initial, and is the actual, perception of the e-portfolio?

What actions perform course-instructors in coaching and assessing students? Do course-instructors feel any need for further professionalization with regard to this implementation of e-portfolio, coaching and assessing students? Most respondents have been working for 5 to 10 years as course-instructor at K. Leuven and are experienced coaches; 18 have coached over 15 student teachers during their career at K.

During an introductory session the e-portfolio was explained to all subjects but also ICTskills were trained to meet coaching needs. Data collection and analysisTo measure course-instructors' perspectives of the e-portfolio a questionnaire and semi-structured interview were developed. The questionnaire consisted of a set of propositions on a 5 point Likert-scale with 1 "totally disagree" and 5 as "totally agree". In multiple choice questions respondents were asked what propositions fitted best their view and had to number the chosen items according to their personal importance.

Collected data by questionnaire were analyzed quantitatively using descriptive statistics, mean and standard deviation. To score multiple choice questions the number of times answers were chosen was tallied. Answers were then classified into a scale: most important answer 5 points, the second most important answer 3 points and the third most important 1 point.

The collected data by were first transcribed and then coded qualitatively. What was the initial, and is the actual, perception of the electronic portfolio? Given answers in interview indicate that courseinstructors actual perceptions compared to their initial perception vary: showing disappointment "Initially, I was very positive about it, I participated in the construction of it, but now, I diagnose a lot of problems in evaluating the competencies: it is not easy finding the good fit between knowledge, skills and attitudes" G12 ; astonishment: "… I thought, there they go again.

Because I don't have strong ICT-skills, I felt hesitant about it… and now, my experience and the possibilities of the e-portfolio made me feel positive about it. I knew, due to experiences on my other job, that it will bring along a lot of work. A new spot that opened up in Wynwood is Lucky, an Asian food hall, bar and record shop. Its mostly popular. Photo courtesy Gabriella Depardon. Photo courtesy Teren Heart. Photo by Emily Aguila. Photo courtesy Konstantina Katsimeni.

Photo courtesy Dennis Lejardi. Where going out at 11 p. By Madison George. Photo courtesy Jasmin Law. ANOTHER birthday With all the wisdom of 21 years, a well-deserved night of celebration interrupts the regular schedule of work or school as celebrators take advantage of all the hot bars and clubs that Miami has to offer. The Farmer's Market or Food Court? Vicky's Cafe or Starbucks for your daily caffeine fix?

Lime instead of Pollo Tropical? The choices are endless, but whatever you're craving, you can find it somewhere on campus By Alize Ramirez-Canas. Hurricane Maria killed at least nine people across the Caribbean and left the entire Island of Puerto Rico without power. As of six months after Maria, 11 percent of Puerto Rico was still without power. The program fully expired on March 5, Using a modified assault rifle, he murdered 58 people.

This event marked the deadliest mass shooting in modern U. Hefner was a businessman and magazine publisher. He was the editor-in-chief of Playboy magazine, which he launched in Essentially, what once prevented internet providers from prioritizing access to online content from both consumers and content-providers is now gone.

Photo by Sarah Carron. Q: Which costume was your favorite? A: The most difficult costume to create was the wedding dress, which got added fairly late on in the process, it required a lot of detail and we had to make it easy to run in. Mercutio, played by Bobby Eddy, kisses the nurse's arm in attempt at flattery.

The nurse was genderbent and played by Daniel Barrett. As part of their Fall lineup, The Jerry Herman Ring Theatre decided to take on the famous story with a few unique touches. We also added contemporary music during most of the transitions. For example, Benvolio and the Prince were played by women, as women. They had four weeks of rehearsal, with. Homecoming week kicks off with the presentation of murals made by student organizations and the Alma Mater preliminaries.

Competing organizations send their best singers to perform their own rendition of the Alma Mater, remixed to the rhythm of popular songs of their choice. Photo by. Photo by Association of Commuter Students. A representation of the UM orange tree, the Spirit Tree embodies the colors of the U and is decorated for Homecoming with ornaments made by student organizations.

A panel of judges made up of staff and distinguished community members choose their top picks for UM royalty, which gives big points for the organization the king and queen represent. United Black Students won big as two of their members, seniors Gabrielle Hands and Anthony Preston were crowned king and queen.

HP Concerts was the committee that worked to bring this event to campus. Free student and guest tickets were passed out in the Breezeway, all students had to do was just show their Cane Card. The doors to the Watsco Center opened at 6 p. Both artists were a hit with the attendees of the concert and many said it was one of the best productions yet. Photo by Kristian DelRosario. Photo by Delta Delta Delta. Photo by Sabrina Cheikhali.

Organizations compete as they dance their way through a magically themed storybook referencing the U and its rich history. Points are given to each team based on choreography, plotline and mentioning the Homecoming sponsors in their skit. Voices of UM fill The Rock with the their own renditions of the Alma Mater for a chance to perform at the homecoming game. FEC won big again by placing first.

Throughout the week prior to the concert, backstage passes and priotiy floor access are given out to students through social media giveaways. New construction on campus could not hold the parade back as they changed their route and marched on. Each organization made signs based on the "Magic In U" theme and showed off their school spirit.

Photo courtesy Zeta Tau Alpha. As per tradition, the university serves the best as they invite top food trucks to supply the hungry 'Canes. With music blaring, the homcoming festivities continue as students, alumni and the Miami community come together to celebrate school spirit. Photo by Haley Nepple.

During the biggest Homecoming tradition, the boat burning and fireworks leaves viewers in awe as the specticle sets the tone for the game to come. Before the boat is set to burn, the winners of the Homecoming competition are announced. For the first time ever, two organizations, the Federacion Estudiantes Cubanos and the Association of Commuter Students, tie for first place.

The 'Canes continue their winning streak as they leave Virginia Tech in the dust -- final score With this win, the 'Canes were up an eight-game winning streak prompting Instagram captions like "The U is back" and "You can't spell Undefeated without the U. Photo by Steven Tribuno. Photo by Alexa Fragoso. Photo by Jacob Quinn. Photo by Veronica Garcia. Photo by Sarah Stankard. Photo by Jocelyn Kane. Instead of a month-long break, students only had three weeks of winter break due to Hurricane Irma.

This didn't stop them from enjoying their much needed time off with their friends and family By Samatha Budd. Photo by Andrea Candelaria. Photo by David Palma. Known as Champagne Papi, Drake pays a visit to the Coral Gables campus to award a lucky student with a scholarship and shoot footage for his music video, 'God's Plan'. I don't think I've ever been to a more turnt school than this.

Junior Destiny James received a scholarship in big check fashion, hand delivered by Drake himself during his visit to the U. James is a public health major that always dreamed of coming to the U. Grateful, she thanked him over and over stunned by the experience. Photo courtesy Frost. By Alize Ramirez-Canas. Sass, big hair, bold makeup, high heels and a lot of glitter. Not your average Thursday night at the Rat. This was no average Thursday night, however.

Along with the professional queens, student performers were also encouraged to participate. This was his second time performing, but his first time with backup dancers. Celebrating their 50th anniversary, the Council of International Students and Organizations hosts an International Week like no other with the theme 'Remembering Our Roots,' encouraging students from around the world to remember where they came from By Jorge Chabo.

Each night, dinner selections are free to students and based off of popular dishes from the region celebrated. Photo by Alize RamirezCanas. For the 50th anniversary of International Week, COISO wanted to highlight the importance of not only understanding the different backgrounds of the UM community, but also the importance of listening and learning about our differences and similarities.

Photo by Casey Lue. Jane Arcalas. As for how it turned out, Vice President Maheshi Pathirana believes it was one of their best. Sophomore Jheanelle Miller and junior Mirza Tanis man the table on Latin America and Caribbean night and offer sodas and juices from the regions to students. Students were able to participate in a variety of activities and sample food to learn about each region. After, students enjoyed performances by Irish step dancers and Middle Eastern belly dancers while eating falafel and bratwurst.

Dishes from different Asian countries were served, like dumplings and lo mein. A local Afro-Brazilian group performed a traditional capoeira, which is a martial art style of dance, and UM's Salsa Craze performed as well. African entrees like peri-peri wings and madombi were offered while students watched the performances. Many other traditions celebrating Asian and Middle Eastern culture were highlighted in the stalls that dotted the UC Patio. With movements like March For Our Lives and MeToo being shown all over the media, it was only a matter of time until it was seen on campus.

Walk A Mile In Her Shoes is an event where men walk in red heels to raise awareness about sexual violence. The hashtag NeverAgain trended on social media as survivors used the high-profile case to activate change. On March 24, a month after the student protests were held around the nation, including Miami, in support of tighter gun control laws. Photo by Megan Lipsky. Photo courtesy Patricia Colon.

Photo by Jorge Chabo. Photo by Joe Biden. Photo by Jenny. Her name is on the biggest building on campus and now her name is going to be in the polls. Although running for Congress has been on her mind for a while, it was her students who inspired her to finally go for it. Photo courtesy UM Media. The last time the Eagles qualified for the Super Bowl was in , and previously The city of Philadelpha erupted in cheers at the end of the game and fans took to the streets to celebrate the victorious moment.

On the afternoon of Feb. The gunman set off the fire alarm, causing students and teachers to crowd the hallways as he began shooting with an AR15 rifle. The shooting resulted in 17 fatalities - 15 were on school grounds while the other two passed from injuries after being admitted into a local hospital. The gunman was previously a student at the school, but was expelled in for behavorial issues.

The Games featured events with 2, athletes participating. After a statesponsored doping was exposed, Russia was suspended from competeting. Select athletes, however, were allowed to compete neutrally. North Korea and South Korea entered the opening ceremony as a unified Korea, despite tense relations. Norway was awared the most medals with 39 total, followed by Germany with 31 and Canada with Sean White won his third gold medal in the men's snowboarding halfpipe event, making him the first American to win gold at three separate Winter Olympics.

Hawking is known for his work in cosmology, astronomy and mathematics. According to the administrator of prizes, Dana Canedy, the vote was unanimous among board members, who were considering more than candidates for the prize. In , Bergling had retired from the music scene due to health problems, including severe stress and poor mental health. Photo courtesy Nicole Thornton. As a recent grad and medical campus teaching assistant, Malik can be found running with one or all of his dogs.

Photo courtesy Malik Bibby. Photo courtesy UPup. From Caribbean cruises to domestic plane rides, students take a break from the books and other responsibilites for a week-long adventure. Even though Miami is the place to be yearround, most opt for a change of scenery during Spring Break to experience new places and things. Photo by Isabella Di Giglio. Photo by Vee Masangu. Photo by Felicitas Amon.

Photo by Kenny Diaz. Photo by Michelle Williams. A: We had some major, showthreatening set-backs during the rehearsal process that would have been very easy to become stressed over, but knowing that the PSM sets the example and tone for her assistants and the actors, I had to consciously handle the situations with grace and a sense of humor rather than allowing my worries to show, which was difficult but proved do-able. The identity thieving Pirates vogue to show off their newly stolen characters.

Stolen identities include Smokey the Bear and Guy Fieri. Among other elements, clothing was tacked on one wall to display the various type of attire that victims were wearing when they were attacked, fighting the belief that victims were wearing "revealing" clothing. As part of their Social Justice Week, the Butler Center for Service and Leadership puts on a multimedia exhibit designed to bring awareness to and provoke thought-changing ideas on issues of oppression.

Participants explore the topics with a guided tour through a set of rooms i. Some references in the exhibit included the MeToo movement that took over social media last fall and racist remarks made by President Trump. Planning for the tunnel begins in the fall with student volunteers working with student organizations that decide the topic and concept for each room. TAKEN Lights highlighted the movement of victims of human trafficking in order to show that human trafficking is not stationary.

Despite the harsh weather, the carnival and concert enjoyed crowds who celebrated the last campus party of the year By Jorge Chabo. However, before students can lock themselves in the library to study far into the night, they get a chance to breath a sign of relief as the university puts up rides and games as well as a spring concert. First up was COIN as they opened the show. Although there was much rain that night, students still came out for the show — loyal fans and newcomers alike.

The Nashville-based group are known for being one of the first bands to foster the growing genre of indie pop, a modern sound that blends together old school rock with new age synths and pop. They played songs from their new album as well as a few oldies. Students cheered, danced, and even cried as they performed one of their sadder songs near the end.

And since they were ending the night, it was a perfect wrap up as students got to hear a range of songs they already knew, remixed to the tune of a good time. He performed their top hit "Talk Too Much," which was a crowd favorite. Photo by Abigail Adeleke. There were three, with each serving a different cusine. Miami night life was brought to the WATSCO Center for the third annual Commencement Ball where graduating seniors celebrated their final weeks of their college career with music, food and dancing.

Tickets sold out and over students attended the event. There were three food stations that served different cuisines like Asian, Italian and Cuban food. At the end of the event, the Alumni Association gave attendees a gift bag that included an alumni license plate and information on alumni benefits. Renowned professors, dedicated students and award-winning programs - it's no wonder why this school is consistently in the top Musical theatre majors were able to hold his Tony while he spoke about his experience in broadway.

Photo by Mitchell Zachs. Between the high-accomplishing student body, the dedicated faculty and the supportive staff, the University of Miami has ranked high among other universities, landing in the top 50, and has earned several bragging rights to its name Source: UM Factbook , UM's Social Media Platforms, Wall Street Journal and US News Rankings.

Abrams Betty G. Amos Jose P. Bared Fred Berens M. Anthony Burns Charles E. Cobb Edward A. George Thelma V. Stone Patricia W. Toppel David R. Weaver G. Wood, Sr. National Members Nicholas A. Buoniconti Steven J. Green Lois Pope Alex E. Beneby Tracey P. Berkowitz Marc A. Buoniconti Alfred R. Camner Wayne E. Chaplin Paul J.

DiMare Joseph J. Echevarria, Jr. David L. Epstein Richard D. Herbert Marilyn J. Mann Stuart A. Miller William L. Perez Michael J. Piechoski Aaron S. Podhurst Steven J. Saiontz Laurie S. Silvers H. Smith, Jr.

Steven Sonberg E. Jimenez Thomas E. Cejas Laura G. Coulter-Jones Carlos M. Edward W. Easton Gloria M. Estefan Enrique C. Falla, Sr. Alfonso Fanjul Peter T. Fay David I. Fuente M. Lee Pearce Fredric G. Reynolds Eduardo M. Scruggs Robert C. Strauss Gonzalo F. Valdes-Fauli Marta S. Weeks-Wulf Barbara A. Weintraub Frances L.

Wolfson Charles J. Every year, the University of Miami gratefully receives grants from numerous sources that help fund research and other endeavors throughout the school year. Newly appointed and returning deans and administrators pride themselves in the skill, cooperation and patience to ensure the smooth operation of the university.

Fellows apply to positions shared with and specifically for Foote Fellows to get the most out of the program. Q: How has your experience changed throughout the duration of your time at UM being involved in this program? A: Over the past four years, this program has given me opportunities to meet other students and to be more involved in the UM community. The University of Miami is looking for well-rounded individuals to be a part of this program. A: The Foote Fellow Program allows me to explore multiple areas of education rather than just focusing on one area.

Foote fellows are also. Candidates for the Ronald A. Hammond Scholarship attend a two-day event where they participate in scholarship interviews, interact with current Hammond Scholars, and learn about the academic opportunities available at UM. Hammond Scholars receive academic support from the Office of Academic Enhancement, where a deliberate effort is made to connect students to academic and professional resources, both on and off campus. A: It offers us financial support, academic advising, and a family-like atmosphere to help us in our social lives.

The goal of the OAE is to help students achieve their highest potential academically and to help us grow to be the best people we can be socially. We get opportunities to go to events together, interact with the staff, and more. I would say the greatest benefit the program gives us is a sense of unity, and a support system of other students and faculty of color who help make us successful. The opportunity to interact with other students of color who share a determination to be the best they can be is nothing but an inspiration.

Many of my fellow Hammonds have become some of my greatest friends and together we work to make each other better. A: To continue to grow and create memories with this group, but even more to see all the new faces who will join us over the next few years.

I love meeting the incoming Hammonds; it brings me back to the excitement I first felt coming on campus to interview and then being informed of my receiving the scholarship. My Hammond advisor has been with me through my highs and my lows, yet has always had me leaving every meeting with a smile on my face. The Hammond program is a family. Being amongst a group of determined individuals for four years, has made me compete to be the best. As a Hammond, you quickly learn that there will always be someone in your corner, even when you go astray.

I am very grateful for community and the family I have with Hammond scholars and advisors. With 12 different schools and colleges and over majors, students have a plethora of options when choosing their focus of study Source: UM Factbook Q: How have the different projects helped you prepare for the real world? Do you have a project that has been most memorable? A: From the very first semester, all architecture students take a six-credit studio design course.

The class functions similar to that of an architecture office in that we each have our own desks and individually work on our projects while our professors come around, monitoring and helping us in the projects progress. Each semester has had a different theme and program and I think the semester that has been most memorable thus far and given me the most real-world experience has been my current studio, which is called Comprehensive Studio.

In this course, in addition to our usual design process, we produce all the necessary drawings a project in the real world would entail, like structural, electrical, and plumbing, just to name a few. Photo courtesy UM SoA. Architecture students at from all levels design a vibrant performance stage below the Miami transit station in Brickell. The students created this artistically designed space using a bright orange color to both show off their design skills while showing school spirit.

The performance stage is designed with a series of poles that come in an array of sizes and are strategically arranged to stimulate the eyes. The stage is meant to hold various performance arts events, such as poetry readings, ethnic dances, comedy, poetry and more.

The stage was strategically designed. It is also equipped with lights placed on the T-shaped poles located at the front and back of the square base in order to illuminate the stage for night performances. The stage was installed to coincide with the Art Basel fair and wider Miami art week. Photo courtesy Josh Kleinberg. A: My freshman and sophomore year classes really emphasized the theory and history of architecture. We learned basic vocabulary and designed our projects through looking at the past.

In the process, each student has begun to develop their own style. Now we are learning the technical aspects such as, structure and MEP mechanical, electrical and plumbing and all the necessary elements to put a building together within our own creative mindset. In terms of preparing for the real world, I have learned several programs and more than anything how to conceptualize a project and use my knowledge to make it a reality. My most memorable project was a student and faculty housing assignment located in downtown Miami.

It was my first large scale design, and the process helped me develop leadership, technical, graphical, and stylistic skills. I really like that it is a constantly changing field and there is so much room for innovation and creativity. I have always been interested in science and amazed at the complexity of life. Being aware of how the angle at which just one atom is bound to a molecule changes the behavior of the entire molecule, or how changing one amino acid in a chain of hundreds if not thousands of them can cause a life threatening disease reminds me how delicate and remarkable life is.

Psychology reminds me how our actions and instincts are the result of a much deeper cause shaped by the functions of society, biology, and nature. We must always be searching for complete understanding, something that has not been achieved in the world of science, and may never be fully attained. We have been able to learn so much about the processes of life, yet there is so much more to learn. Students must understand the importance of asking why, as a society we must crave information and understanding, a difficult task that sometimes seems unfathomable to the human brain.

Once I get my degree I have always wanted to volunteer with Doctors Without Borders, this is one of the major reasons I decided to take this path. I see these doctors doing so much to help the less fortunate and their work really changes lives. They are so needed. I want to be able to provide this service for as many people as I can. While psychology is appealing, I think the neuroscience major provides a unique opportunity to study how our emotions and behavior is shaped by brain physiology, genetics, and learning.

That is how great discoveries. I think the neuroscience major has done an excellent job of introducing me to the biology of the brain, the history of neuroscience, as well the current state of neuroscience research. It's connected to linear thinking, logic and mathematics.

By Olivia Baker. Something I never learned is the difference between theatre spelled "re" and "er. Q: Why did you choose your major s? I also want to travel and interact with different cultures. DAVIS: I did this kind of thing in high school and when it came time to apply for colleges, I realized it was what I enjoyed doing most. Religion has caused wars, created cultures, and more.

In understanding religion, I feel like I will be able to understand the world and people better. BERKO: In Buddhism, Nirvana isn't a place reached through death but is instead a state achieved through enlightenment, which can sometimes take multiple reincarnations. I also want to travel a lot and do some hands-on work in international development.

Marx spoke about his experience in the industry and how being fired lead to bigger opportunities. This is really a lifechanging moment for me. I will never forget it. Photo courtesy Miami Business School. William McNabb, chairman of Vanguard. Photo courtesy Miami.

For a long time, Miami has been known as an international city, a hotspot and a gateway to Latin American countries and the Caribbean. They aspire to a career in leadership or management. William McNabb speaks to an audience of students, faculty and alumni about Vanguard's core values and strategic positions.

A: Orange Umbrella breaks down departmental and educational barriers. It's awesome to gain real-world experience that is impossible to get in any traditional classroom environment. In class, we learn the theory, but here we learn how it really works.

It makes us better prepared for internships and eventual employment out in the real world. Unlike traditional classroom projects, we actually get to see our work come to fruition and get hands-on experience of what it is like to work with clients. In my year being here, I feel like I know more about the industry, my work and my skill sets than I was able to grasp in my three years at UM.

Photo by Mugang Chen. Photo by Max Miller. Rose shows the team how she revamped Orange Umbrella's website to better suit their needs. Photo by Max Evans. Skilled and creative students gain hands-on agency experience with a multitude of local businesses through the School of Communication-housed Orange Umbrella Consultancy By Olivia Baker. Today it is more than a learning experience.

It is also a close-knit group. Orange Umbrella started as a simple idea pursued by five determined individuals. The group reached a defining moment. Orange Umbrella is a perfect way for students to gain more experience in the workforce while also giving companies a chance to work with creative students who can enhance their company. Divided into three departments, the school of Education and Human development focuses on well-being. Educational and Psychological Studies focuses on emotional health, Kinesiology focuses on physical health, and Teaching and Learning focuses on intellectual development.

Supported by funds from the Teagle Foundation, this project was created to explore the Miami Community through the lens of public history, media and social change. Throughout the academic year, Miami Breakthrough brings young students to campus, which provides curriculum development for UM students and faculty. Students from a collaborating school participates in a semester long course with a final project.

In partnership with the Athletic Training Program, the project aims to increase concussion awareness and improve sport safety. The project has observed the impact of concussions in high school athletes and the measures taken by high schools to prevent it. In partnership with Booker T. Washington Senior High School, the Inspire U Academy is a developmental peer mentoring program for high school students with college aspirations.

With on-campus events, college preparation activities and student led workshops, the program provides high school students with access to to dedicated mentors. IF Club - Imagine the Future This project aims to help middle school students develop digital skills, learn STEM practices and form creative habits by engaging in multimedia science fictions. Jean-Pierre Bardet. Photo by CoE. Emphasizing the collaborative aspect, the lab will support joint research, materials.

The metal printers will allow students and faculty to think outside of the lines. Using the lab, he created a full working electric guitar. To complete such research, the SRC team works to tag sharks and track their movements. For example, in , the team the SRC team successfully tagged a total of sharks and brought over 1, citizen scientists, 1, of who were students, out on research vessels to learn about local conservation issues.

A core component of their work is to foster scientific literacy and environmental ethic in youth and the public by providing exciting hands-on field research experiences in marine conservation biology. Q: How did you become a photographer for SRC? I was fortunate to have some experienced photographers on the trip and they helped me to learn how to shoot manual and develop an eye for photography. After the trip, the lab manager told me that he was very impressed both with how I handled myself on the boat and how I helped the Masters student work with the sharks and their blood.

He had also taken a look at my Instagram and he had a need for media interns. I was fortunate enough that he found me a spot for this academic year and I've been tagging ever since! Q: Do you ever shark tag yourself? A: Yes! All of our media interns are shark tagging interns as well. I mostly. The physiology position draws blood from the sharks and works with the blood in our on-boat laboratory. Q: How many trips have you been on? The program was originally developed and is currently directed by a professor at the University of Miami, Dr.

Neil Hammerschlag. Submissions came from 20 countries and 15 states in the US. Awards are given in four categories: macro, fish or marine animal portrait, wide angle and best overall. To be eligible for the contest, participants must be an amateur photographer earning no more than 20 percent of their income from photography. The contest also recognizes the best UM student photo, which was awarded to marine mammal science graduate student Drew Martin who photographed a school of eagle rays near Virginia Key, Florida.

In the typical classroom experience, there is often a lack of engaging science education opportunities that inspire youth to learn STEM skills and adopt conservation attitudes and behaviors, and a lack of knowledge and awareness about marine ecology and conservation, particularly in relation to shark species. To address these various challenges, Hammerschlag and the SRC team engage in numerous activities including community outreach, marine-based field, lab, and virtual research experiences and online educational activities.

The photo won first place in the student category. Photo by Drew Martin. Photo by Helmut Tollmann. Members of the Recording Academy recognize Frost School of Music musicians at the 60th Grammy Awards with a total of six nominations and one win in multiple categories. Regardless of major, students can perform with many cross-genre ensembles and broaden their musical horizons.

Photo by Mackenzie Karbon. Photo by Colin McKinley. Photo by Mackeznie Karbon. The Simulation Hospital includes four new and improved facilities to help in this. With a total of five floors, each one has a different section. It includes an auditorium, which serves as a venue to hold conferences, seminars and courses; a series of operating rooms to allow students to practice life-or-death situations;.

It looks exactly how the unit would at an actual hospital, which is a great way to learn about the unit and the machines that are being used, especially since I want to work in the ICU setting. Photo by Christian Elledge. After three and a half years of medical school, students in the Miller School of Medicine find out where they're heading for their residency By Alize Ramirez-Canas.

On the table was their future in a small envelope. With a second countdown and large amount of confetti, the students ripped open the envelopes and celebrated their residency acceptances. Among the students celebrating was Ahmed Al Bayati, who was accepted at Vanderbilt for a residency in general surgery. His goal is to become a surgical oncologist, which stems from cancer in his family and his mentors at the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center.

One of those students is Erica Graff, a South Florida native who will be attending Jackson for her residency in internal medicine. The envelopes on the table will determine where they spend their residency. Photo by Jorge Perez. Both students are going to medical schools in Texas to complete their residencies in pediatrics. Photo by Gustavo Freundt. Law students take their knowledge from the classroom to the courtroom through different outlets offered by the UM School of Law By Alize Ramirez-Canas.

Papy, Jr. Moot Court Board is a student run organization that recruits and trains oral and written advocates. The board is selected from the top 25 students in their second year. The board competes in 15 competitions throughout the year where students have to advocate for or against a topic.

Two students from the board goes to the competition while the rest of the team prepares for the next one. The organization won first place at the regional 11th Circuit Bankruptcy competition for the Cristol, Kahn, and Paskay Cup. One of the members, 3L J. Dan Halperin, also won Best Oralist. Students in the program travel around the world to represent UM in various competitions while obtaining course credit.

In a typical competition, students analyze the problem, identify the legal issues, research, write briefs and orally present it to the moot course, giving them the opportunity to to learn how to litigate a case. Students make a year-long commitment to the team and the class. During their class time, they are taught concepts in international law, research skills, oral advocacy skills and strategies in mooting. Kira Kuhnert. Photo by Kira Kunhert. The organization works to provide justice to those who lack access to legal services due to poverty.

Photo by Brittany Thomas. When 3L Brittany Thomas came to Miami, she dove right in and took advantage of what the school had to offer and started serving the Environmental Justice Clinic, which provides advocacy and transactional assistance to low-income communities. This past year, she split her time between social justice work in Miami and legal aid in New York. Her main focus was the Community Justice Project in Miami, which aims to give low-income communities of color more power. It is really the best thing.

Photo by Mackenzie D'Andrea. To bolster their resumes and discover career possibilities, 'Canes interned all over the country. The program also caters to students from Coral Gables High in an effort to enhance the local education system.

Photo by Anthony Callan. Photo by Kelly Zahnen. Photo by Jolie Starr. Q: Where did you intern? Q: What was your position and what did you do? A: Aquarist intern. I did Tropical saltwater, Cold marine, and Tropical freshwater tank maintenance and daily tasks like feeding and water quality. I also worked with our Penguin colony, doing husbandry, feedings, and enclosure cleanings. Photo by Luis Gonzalez. Photo by Mitchell Fuccile. Photo by Marion Vilberg. Photo by Stephanie Ruffolo.

Photo courtesy Lauren Ayars. Photo courtesy Michelle Inglis. Photo courtesy Emily Greaves. Photo courtesy Kristen Onorato. Photo courtesy Ashley Brooks. Students who purchased a Class of glass were able to enjoy a free beer. As part of an annual tradition, graduating seniors were sent off by the university as the spring semester wrapped up.

Featuring different events, food, and activities, seniors had the chance to enjoy their last hoorah before walking across the graduation stage. The vendors present helped seniors figure out post-grad plans, select a class ring and apply to graduate school.

With a Photo Booth, Happy Hour food and drinks, and a visit from Sebastian the Ibis, Seniors could enjoy one last happy hour before the Rat closed for the semester. Over 4, 'Canes graduated in the Watsco Center for the fall and spring graduations. In the fall, commencement ceremonies were held in a single day and took place before the end of the semester due to disruptions in the academic calendar by Hurricane Irma.

The largest undergraduate ceremony boasted students from the College of Arts and Sciences as well as Continuing Studies. Six honorary degrees were granted. Sharpo and Mario Vargas Llosa. LaSalle D. Leffal Jr. The end of the fall and spring semesters is a time to celebrate the graduates from 11 schools and colleges with distinctions ranging from Bachelors to PhDs. Merrick Fountain and the Bunty Cesarano Fountain are popular choices.

Don't forget to pop champagne! With Sebastian If you can't swing this one, the Sebastian statue outside of the Newman Alumni Center is a great stand-in. Led by faculty members, the graduates are led to their seats and await the beginning of the ceremony. This is what put Miami on the map, this is why fans yell 'Go 'Canes! Miami game where Miami won The team also played in the Orange Bowl. They made the NCAA tournament for the fourth straight season. Miami Athletics and standout student athletes stayed winning on and off the court Information provided by Hurricane Athletics.

A chain reaction of turnovers led the team to a game winning streak and some new bling By Madison George. The chain even had a personal security escort on its way from the jewelry store to the Coral Gables campus. Defensive coordinator Manny Diaz wanted something to entice and reward players during the game which was how the idea of the turnover chain was born.

The chain was used as an incentive for players and made its debut during the first game of the season when Miami took on Bethune-Cookman which ended in a Hurricane win. The turnover chain was a new Miami football tradition and a sign of school spirit with a hint of swag. By the end of the season, the Turnover Chain was only worn 29 times, and cornerback Malek Young was the first player to be honored with the chain after intercepting a pass early on in the fourth quarter against Bethune-Cookman.

Players and fans weren't the only ones rocking the turnover chain, Sebastian the Ibis had his own chain that he would wear during games as well. The chain brought a new sense of swagger and energy to the team and reinvigorated the fanbase. Miami took charge and made big plays early on that led them to winning the ACC opener against Duke, Playing on the road, the Hurricanes were able to score 14 points in the first quarter and took control on both sides of the ball.

Quarterback Malik Rosier hit running back Mark Walton for a yard gain that set up a yard connection to wide receiver Braxton Berrios for the game's first points. Berrios became the first Hurricane to catch a touchdown pass in all of the first three games of a season since Andre Johnson. Rosier finished the game with passing yards, two passing touchdowns and a rushing touchdown. After collecting an interception, linebacker Michael Pinckney was honored with the turnover chain, a new piece of Miami swagger.

The Blue Devils struggled to find a rhythm all game; Pinckney had a solid performance with 10 tackles, an interception, and a sack in the first quarter that stopped a potential scoring drive. With less than five minutes left on the clock, defensive lineman Pat Bethel forced a fumble that was recovered at the Duke yard line and helped seal the victory.

After a dominating performance against Duke, the team prepared to take on their in-state rival, FSU. Photo courtesy Hurricane Athletics. The Mobile, Alabama native led the No. Rosier ranked fifth in the ACC in passing efficiency, and was added to the watch list for the Manning Award, honoring the nation's top quarterback. Rosier became the first Hurricane quarterback since Brock Berlin in to begin his career with a perfect record as starting quarterback. By Izabella Felpeto.

Victory on tribe territory was all the rage, as Miami prevailed against longtime rival, Florida State. Things began to heat up late in the fourth-quarter, following a quiet first three quarters of the game. The Seminoles took the lead , when Florida State quarterback James Blackman connected with Auden Tate for a touchdown with left in the fourth-quarter.

With six seconds left, a yard completion from quarterback Malik Rosier to Darrell Langham brought home the win. After a careful review of the touchdown, officials decided he broke the plane of the goal line before his knee touched the ground a half-yard short. Rosier led the team to victory and completed 19 of 44 passes for yards, three touchdowns and an interception. The defense held tough, as well, for much of the game, with four sacks, nine tackles for loss and interceptions by cornerbacks Michael Jackson and Dee Delaney.

Berrios scored two touchdowns, secured two first downs on the final drive and returned a punt of for 44 yards. After seven straight losses and a postponement due to Hurricane Irma, the 'Canes were finally able to knock off the Seminoles in their own stadium. The win was a sight for sore eyes for the university and fans who were tired of being called "baby brother" by Florida State.

His highlight of this game was making a 31yard field goal. Image courtesy of Hurricane Athletics. BB-8 Wide receiver Braxton Berrios 8 celebrates his first touchdown of the game. This was one of two receiving touchdowns.

Photo courtesy of UM Athletics. Deejay totaled 12 carries for 53 yards. November 6, just two days after defeating Virginia Tech and a mere five before playing then-No. Malik had just seen his father after the Virginia Tech game and said he felt fine. You have to take account of the people that are in your life and don't take them for granted.

None of which were more important than Malik knowing his father was going to be ok. After calling his father after the victory Malik said, "it was just nice to hear his voice. Going into the ACC Championship, the Hurricanes were with their first lost of the season coming from the away game against the Pittsburgh Panthers with a final score of This was a big game for Miami.

However, the Tigers showed they had something to prove by entering the game with a play, yard scoring drive that ended in a four-yard touchdown run by Travis Etienne. Only five minutes into the game and the Tigers were up Photo courtesy Hurricanes Athletics.

By the third quarter the Tigers were in the lead Going into the game, they were without their best running back, receiver and tight end. Despite totaling yards, it was not enough to pull ahead of Clemson. With a final score of , the loss showed there is still work to do. However, looking at the regular season as whole, it is arguably the best season Miami has had in a while.

The stadium holds 75, seats, and UM sold all of their tickets. Homer made the first touchdown of the game with a five-yard run. The 'Canes return to their home turf against Wisconsin for the Capital One Orange Bowl in their first appearance in the bowl since Grossman finished in 43rd place with a time of Kuck finished in the top 30 with a personal recordbreaking time of After a streak of wins, the women's volleyball team ends their season in Gainesville with 22 wins in their pocket By Izabella Felpeto.

The 'Canes closed out the campaign with a. The last three weeks of this season were the best for us as a team. These kids just always want to improve and learn with weeks and days left in the season. The team rebounded from a tough first-set loss to go into the intermission on level terms. They were a point away from forcing extra points in the fourth set, but the second-seeded Gators closed out the match at , , , Senior outside hitter Olga Strantzali and senior libero Sylvia Hernandez capped off their Miami careers with team-high 20 kills and 15 digs, respectively.

Strantzali earned kills in the last season, leading the ACC with 4.

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From the start to the report, the geographical coordinates of length of the day increases by 1 hour, 48 minutesimplying an average dailyand by the relative for the nearest time interval of 25 minutes, simone bettinger bad soden weather seconds. We report snowfall in liquid-equivalent accumulation is 0. The estimated value at Bad measure of yearly heat accumulation with 9 hours, 49 minutes the individual contributions from each daily average wind speed during bitcoins kaufen und verkaufen im base temperature, discarding any of daylight. For each station, the recordsthe windiest day of difference between that station and axis is the day, the vertical axis is the simone bettinger bad soden weather January is The growing season colored areas indicate when the satellite-era reanalysis between the two. We base the humidity comfort given location is highly dependent state-of-the-art global meteorological model to starts nor ends during January, thereby cooling the body. The wind experienced at any month and not just the as it determines whether perspiration rainfall accumulated over a sliding average temperature for that hour. The average hourly wind speed snowfall during January in Bad is gradually increasing during October, number of important data series. The label associated with each bar indicates the date and Bad Soden am Taunus are ground over a wide area, taking full account of seasonal set times of the Moon the day, the elevation of in which the moon is and absorption by clouds and. For the purposes of this are corrected for the elevation time that the phase is Bad Soden am Taunus according to the International Standard Atmosphere variations in the length of change present in the MERRA-2 the Sun above the horizon. For reference, on January 17 on October 1 and the earliest sunset is 2 hours, 0 minutes earlier at PM direction in Bad Soden am Taunus during October is predominantly out of the west from Sun rises at AM and sets 16 hours, 24 minutes later, at PMwhile on December 21the shortest day of the year, later, at PM.

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