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Off track betting new york history museums brentford burnley betting on sports

Off track betting new york history museums

Saint Paul, Minnesota contributions helpful votes. This Place Is A Dump. The building is old and run down. The bathrooms are dirty. The track is difficult to get to and parking is a problem. Date of experience: November Long Island, New York 10, contributions 41, helpful votes. Not as nice as Belmont or Saratoga but always a great time. I'm more into harness racing and prefer the Meadowlands. Date of experience: October Great Racetrack. I've always been a fan of horse racing.

This is one of the old racetracks of this region. The seating in the stands is great. Just like Yonkers, you are in the front of the action. Date of experience: May BlueGold75 wrote a review Mar Northampton, Massachusetts 37 contributions 16 helpful votes. Saratoga It Isn't. I'm a horse racing fan and despite the fact I live a few hours from "The Big A", I never made it there until today.

For a casual fan, it very likely would do nothing to turn them on to horse racing or keep them there for very long. For someone who is a horse racing fan, or enjoys a day at the races, they might be able to put up with it for an afternoon.

The racing part of the facility has three floors. The first floor has pidgeons flying around it, and signs not to feed them. Did I mention this is a completely enclosed building in the middle of winter? As you get closer to the doors leading to the race track, the smell of weed was pretty evident. I saw one person going through a garbage can looking for possible winning tickets that might have been thrown away by mistake, usually a no-no at most tracks.

I saw people drinking out of paper bags more than once. If you don't feel like braving the cold to watch the horses being saddled, you can watch through some rather grimy, dirty windows overlooking the paddock. The 2nd floor leads to some outdoor seating if the weather lends itself to it. The 3rd floor seemed a little nicer and less crowded than the rest of the joint. It's clear they've tried to spruce the place up. There's a relatively fresh coat of paint and some murals on the walls.

The place didn't seem unsafe as nobody bothered me during the time I was there. If the weather is decent, it's not too hard to get down to the rail to watch the races up close. The food options in the racing portion of the building were limited. There was one concession stand on the first floor that had burgers, dogs and things like that.

There was a coffee shop stand with bagels and baked goods along with some sandwiches up on the third floor. The casino connects directly to the racing building and there's a food court and other eating options over there. The casino looks much like any of the other ones you've probably been to. It's helpful for many, I'm sure having subway service connected to the building, or just around the corner.

Parking on the racing end of things isn't cheap, although they don't charge admission. While some began advocating for the legalization of off-track betting, arguing that people would always feel compelled to wager, before the s it remained a challenging position to hold for politicians.

In , for instance, New York City Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia denounced the idea in one of his weekly radio addresses, maintaining that off-track betting would pave the way for legalized roulette, faro, dice, and other gambling. Moreover, he stated that the city could balance its budget without "one cent of this dirty or blood money. Race tracks themselves accounted for another 5 percent of the "takeout. Over the next several years, however, the city was unable to fend off politicians at the state level who managed to wrest away the 5 percent, thereby doubling the state's share to 10 percent.

Starting in the s, New York City mayors began to actively lobby for an off-track betting operation that could benefit the city coffers, which were beginning to increasingly feel a financial strain. Not only would the city not have to ask for more state funding, they argued, off-track betting would drive out illegal bookmakers and decrease the burden on the police.

The battle lines for off-track betting were essentially drawn between city Democrats and upstate Republicans. Also involved were a pair of unlikely allies: church groups opposed to gambling and the race tracks opposed to giving up a share of the takeout.

The tracks simply did not believe that off-track betting would increase the betting market, as advocates argued. In , Mayor Robert Wagner placed an off-track betting referendum question on the ballot for city voters. Although it held no legal effect, its support by a three-to-one-margin exerted pressure on upstate politicians, especially after Senator Jacob Javits, a leading Republican and the state's senior senator in the U. Congress, called for the legislature to accede to the voters' wishes.

Nevertheless, over the next several years off-track betting bills died in committee or were defeated by the legislature. All the while, city officials prepared to create a corporation to run the off-track betting operations and as early as were envisioning a computerized wagering system. City-backed legislation was passed permitting the creation of the New York City Off-Track Betting Corporation, a public-benefit corporation to be run by a board of directors to be appointed by the mayor.

The OTB takeout would be 17 percent, with. In an attempt to lessen the impact on the tracks, OTB facilities were mandated to be uncomfortable: no food, no drink, no chairs, no bathrooms. The racing industry, taking no solace in the knowledge that OTB patrons would be made to suffer, was still outraged by the development and turned to the courts to have OTB declared unconstitutional, an effort that ultimately failed.

A long-term conflict between OTB and the industry ensued, resulting, at the best of times, in an uneasy coexistence. Labor unions representing track employees were also hostile to the new venture, afraid that a long-term slide in track attendance would only be aggravated by OTB and cost them jobs. Samuels had considerable business experience, having co-founded Kordite Company, best known for the creation of Baggies. Samuels made several million dollars when the company was sold to Mobil Oil.

Billed as the "New Game in Town," OTB began operations on April 8, , less than a year after the passage of off-track betting legislation, becoming the first legalized off-track betting operation in the United States. The start was modest, with only two betting facilities available to take wagers on that night's harness races at Roosevelt Raceway: several windows at Grand Central Terminal and an OTB shop in Forest Hills, Queens. Other patrons, lacking the privileges of rank, waited in line as long as two hours to place their bets.

Because OTB's computer system was not yet deemed reliable, they used three-part betting slips that took time to fill out and were then manually checked. Moveover, it was evident that the slips could easily be altered to create winning tickets. It remained a controversial venture, however, with its computer system proving to be slow and unreliable and attendance at local tracks falling, thereby cutting into the takeout of both the state and tracks. Parimutuel clerks went on strike at Aqueduct to protest job cuts that the tracks attributed to the loss of patrons cause by OTB.

Critics also contended that OTB was trying to dress the books. Samuels attempted to negotiate with NYRA and the harness tracks about a more equitable split in the OTB takeout, and it appeared that the two sides were on the verge of an agreement. However, relations quickly deteriorated when a racing industry-supported bill was presented in the New York legislature calling for the creation of a board, dominated by racing officials, which would consolidate all of the state's track and off-track betting commissions.

Samuels vowed to fight the obvious attempt to take over OTB, suggesting that the tracks would be better served by cooperating with OTB in order to stimulate bettor interest, especially by permitting televised races. During his tenure as the head of OTB, Samuels was able to fend off attempts to gain control of the organization. He was unsuccessful, however, in expanding the scope of the corporation to include the taking of bets on other sporting events, such as football, baseball, basketball, and hockey.

His successor at OTB, Paul Scevane, who took over in March , floated the idea of a betting card format, in which bettors attempted to pick the highest number of winners on a slate of games, but this concept failed to gain backing, and OTB's quest to become an all-purpose bookie gradually faded. The corporation was having enough trouble fulfilling its stated mission of generating large revenues for the city's coffers.

Despite the disappointment of declining profits, the city continued to collect its 5 percent share of the takeout. OTB received mounting criticism over the years: its parlors were shabby, technology antiquated, management inept, and work force inefficient. Like so many city institutions, it had become a source for political patronage, providing high-paying, high-sounding, do-little jobs to supporters. In the early s, the comptroller's office began urging OTB to cut costs, including the consolidation of branch offices, but little progress was made.

OTB attempted to improve its finances by upgrading its product to spur revenues. Live calls from the race tracks were piped into OTB parlors. These changes did little to offset increased competition over gaming dollars from the state lottery and casinos in Atlantic City and on the lands of Native Americans. Illegal bookmaking operations, featuring satellite-televised races and comfortable accommodations, as well as credit, were also flourishing in the city.

Moreover, the demographics of the typical OTB bettor were troubling. A survey conducted in indicated that almost 70 percent of patrons were over 45 years old. An OTB spokesman was quoted in a Forbes article as saying: "The average bettor is a year-old white man who's overweight and a chain smoker. How long will that customer base be around before you don't have any customers at all?

During Rudolph Guiliani's run for mayor in , the state of OTB became a salient campaign issue when he questioned how a bookie operation could possibly lose money. She clearly regarded OTB as a candy jar: She fired older white managers and replaced them with nonwhites, saddling OTB with big lawsuits from the fired whites and thus adding to OTB's deficit.

Although mayoral candidate Guiliani vowed to sell OTB to private interests, after his election he allowed the corporation a chance to redeem itself. A first step was to simply clean the OTB parlors, which were notoriously dingy and marred by graffiti. Sherman also lowered OTB's overhead by closing twelve poorly performing parlors, cutting back on the number of parlors opened on Sunday to reduce double overtime for labor and eliminating staff through buy-out packages.

More important to revitalizing the fortunes of OTB was a new law that allowed OTB to simulcast out-of-state races in its parlors and the March introduction of experimental in-home simulcasting of races on the city's public access cable channel, which spurred growth in new telephone accounts for both OTB and NYRA.

OTB outlets featuring simulcasts were added to several restaurant locations in Although it appeared that the simulcasts mutually benefited OTB and NYRA, especially in light of the rise of Internet wagering on horse races, the two sides soon fell out over the arrangement.

NYRA blamed in-home signals for a significant drop in track attendance, which OTB officials pointed out was a nationwide trend unconnected to the telecasts. In July , NYRA pulled the plug on the home telecasts, followed in October by cutting off the feed to OTB parlors and teletheaters as well as affiliated bars and restaurants.

The impasse was not settled until November when the parties finally agreed on a four-year contract. As he entered the final year of his administration, unable to run again because of imposed term limits, Mayor Guiliani sought to fulfill a long-term pledge to sell the enterprise to commercial interests, while retaining a minority interest for the city.

The sale faced several obstacles, including a lawsuit from labor unions representing 1, OTB employees, which maintained that the city had not properly evaluated the impact of the sale on city employees as required by law. Any deal would also require approval from the state legislature, which was far from certain. In addition, both suitors for OTB were under somewhat of an ethical cloud. NYRA was under investigation by the state attorney general's office as well as federal authorities for possible tax evasion and money laundering at its three thoroughbred tracks.

One of Magna's partners, Robert W, Green, a British bookmaker and track owner, was tainted by his close association with a New Jersey businessman who had just been convicted of money laundering and bank fraud. Critics claimed that the sale was shortsighted, and opponents, which included NYRA and the OTB union, vowed to stop the transaction in the state legislature. The matter would be put on hold following the September 11, , terrorists attacks that destroyed Manhattan's World Trade Center.

It was still pending when Michael Bloomberg took over as New York's mayor in He floated the novel alternative idea of selling OTB's future revenues for a single, up-front payment, but in the end decided to delay the sale for at least a year, saying that it was uncertain whether OTB would be sold or not.

HORSE RACING PAPER TIPSTERS BETTING

Not only would the city not have to ask for more state funding, they argued, off-track betting would drive out illegal bookmakers and decrease the burden on the police. The battle lines for off-track betting were essentially drawn between city Democrats and upstate Republicans.

Also involved were a pair of unlikely allies: church groups opposed to gambling and the race tracks opposed to giving up a share of the takeout. The tracks simply did not believe that off-track betting would increase the betting market, as advocates argued. In , Mayor Robert Wagner placed an off-track betting referendum question on the ballot for city voters.

Although it held no legal effect, its support by a three-to-one-margin exerted pressure on upstate politicians, especially after Senator Jacob Javits, a leading Republican and the state's senior senator in the U. Congress, called for the legislature to accede to the voters' wishes. Nevertheless, over the next several years off-track betting bills died in committee or were defeated by the legislature.

All the while, city officials prepared to create a corporation to run the off-track betting operations and as early as were envisioning a computerized wagering system. City-backed legislation was passed permitting the creation of the New York City Off-Track Betting Corporation, a public-benefit corporation to be run by a board of directors to be appointed by the mayor.

The OTB takeout would be 17 percent, with. In an attempt to lessen the impact on the tracks, OTB facilities were mandated to be uncomfortable: no food, no drink, no chairs, no bathrooms. The racing industry, taking no solace in the knowledge that OTB patrons would be made to suffer, was still outraged by the development and turned to the courts to have OTB declared unconstitutional, an effort that ultimately failed. A long-term conflict between OTB and the industry ensued, resulting, at the best of times, in an uneasy coexistence.

Labor unions representing track employees were also hostile to the new venture, afraid that a long-term slide in track attendance would only be aggravated by OTB and cost them jobs. Samuels had considerable business experience, having co-founded Kordite Company, best known for the creation of Baggies. Samuels made several million dollars when the company was sold to Mobil Oil.

Billed as the "New Game in Town," OTB began operations on April 8, , less than a year after the passage of off-track betting legislation, becoming the first legalized off-track betting operation in the United States. The start was modest, with only two betting facilities available to take wagers on that night's harness races at Roosevelt Raceway: several windows at Grand Central Terminal and an OTB shop in Forest Hills, Queens. Other patrons, lacking the privileges of rank, waited in line as long as two hours to place their bets.

Because OTB's computer system was not yet deemed reliable, they used three-part betting slips that took time to fill out and were then manually checked. Moveover, it was evident that the slips could easily be altered to create winning tickets. It remained a controversial venture, however, with its computer system proving to be slow and unreliable and attendance at local tracks falling, thereby cutting into the takeout of both the state and tracks.

Parimutuel clerks went on strike at Aqueduct to protest job cuts that the tracks attributed to the loss of patrons cause by OTB. Critics also contended that OTB was trying to dress the books. Samuels attempted to negotiate with NYRA and the harness tracks about a more equitable split in the OTB takeout, and it appeared that the two sides were on the verge of an agreement. However, relations quickly deteriorated when a racing industry-supported bill was presented in the New York legislature calling for the creation of a board, dominated by racing officials, which would consolidate all of the state's track and off-track betting commissions.

Samuels vowed to fight the obvious attempt to take over OTB, suggesting that the tracks would be better served by cooperating with OTB in order to stimulate bettor interest, especially by permitting televised races. During his tenure as the head of OTB, Samuels was able to fend off attempts to gain control of the organization. He was unsuccessful, however, in expanding the scope of the corporation to include the taking of bets on other sporting events, such as football, baseball, basketball, and hockey.

His successor at OTB, Paul Scevane, who took over in March , floated the idea of a betting card format, in which bettors attempted to pick the highest number of winners on a slate of games, but this concept failed to gain backing, and OTB's quest to become an all-purpose bookie gradually faded.

The corporation was having enough trouble fulfilling its stated mission of generating large revenues for the city's coffers. Despite the disappointment of declining profits, the city continued to collect its 5 percent share of the takeout. OTB received mounting criticism over the years: its parlors were shabby, technology antiquated, management inept, and work force inefficient.

Like so many city institutions, it had become a source for political patronage, providing high-paying, high-sounding, do-little jobs to supporters. In the early s, the comptroller's office began urging OTB to cut costs, including the consolidation of branch offices, but little progress was made. OTB attempted to improve its finances by upgrading its product to spur revenues. Live calls from the race tracks were piped into OTB parlors. These changes did little to offset increased competition over gaming dollars from the state lottery and casinos in Atlantic City and on the lands of Native Americans.

Illegal bookmaking operations, featuring satellite-televised races and comfortable accommodations, as well as credit, were also flourishing in the city. Moreover, the demographics of the typical OTB bettor were troubling. A survey conducted in indicated that almost 70 percent of patrons were over 45 years old.

An OTB spokesman was quoted in a Forbes article as saying: "The average bettor is a year-old white man who's overweight and a chain smoker. How long will that customer base be around before you don't have any customers at all? During Rudolph Guiliani's run for mayor in , the state of OTB became a salient campaign issue when he questioned how a bookie operation could possibly lose money. She clearly regarded OTB as a candy jar: She fired older white managers and replaced them with nonwhites, saddling OTB with big lawsuits from the fired whites and thus adding to OTB's deficit.

Although mayoral candidate Guiliani vowed to sell OTB to private interests, after his election he allowed the corporation a chance to redeem itself. A first step was to simply clean the OTB parlors, which were notoriously dingy and marred by graffiti. Sherman also lowered OTB's overhead by closing twelve poorly performing parlors, cutting back on the number of parlors opened on Sunday to reduce double overtime for labor and eliminating staff through buy-out packages.

More important to revitalizing the fortunes of OTB was a new law that allowed OTB to simulcast out-of-state races in its parlors and the March introduction of experimental in-home simulcasting of races on the city's public access cable channel, which spurred growth in new telephone accounts for both OTB and NYRA. OTB outlets featuring simulcasts were added to several restaurant locations in Although it appeared that the simulcasts mutually benefited OTB and NYRA, especially in light of the rise of Internet wagering on horse races, the two sides soon fell out over the arrangement.

NYRA blamed in-home signals for a significant drop in track attendance, which OTB officials pointed out was a nationwide trend unconnected to the telecasts. In July , NYRA pulled the plug on the home telecasts, followed in October by cutting off the feed to OTB parlors and teletheaters as well as affiliated bars and restaurants.

The impasse was not settled until November when the parties finally agreed on a four-year contract. As he entered the final year of his administration, unable to run again because of imposed term limits, Mayor Guiliani sought to fulfill a long-term pledge to sell the enterprise to commercial interests, while retaining a minority interest for the city. The sale faced several obstacles, including a lawsuit from labor unions representing 1, OTB employees, which maintained that the city had not properly evaluated the impact of the sale on city employees as required by law.

Any deal would also require approval from the state legislature, which was far from certain. In addition, both suitors for OTB were under somewhat of an ethical cloud. NYRA was under investigation by the state attorney general's office as well as federal authorities for possible tax evasion and money laundering at its three thoroughbred tracks. One of Magna's partners, Robert W, Green, a British bookmaker and track owner, was tainted by his close association with a New Jersey businessman who had just been convicted of money laundering and bank fraud.

Critics claimed that the sale was shortsighted, and opponents, which included NYRA and the OTB union, vowed to stop the transaction in the state legislature. The matter would be put on hold following the September 11, , terrorists attacks that destroyed Manhattan's World Trade Center.

It was still pending when Michael Bloomberg took over as New York's mayor in He floated the novel alternative idea of selling OTB's future revenues for a single, up-front payment, but in the end decided to delay the sale for at least a year, saying that it was uncertain whether OTB would be sold or not. In the meantime, OTB continued to conduct its wagering business and implemented measures to broaden its appeal to a wider and younger audience. Located in the state of New York, the city has a population of over 8.

The city is also home to the headquarters of the United Nations, and to many of the world's most famous skyscrapers. Popularly known as the "Big Apple," the "Capital of the World," or the "City That Never Sleeps," the city attracts people from all over the globe who come for New York City's economic opportunity, culture, and fast-paced cosmopolitan lifestyle.

He discovered Manhattan on September 11 , and continued up the river that bears his name, the Hudson River, until he arrived at the site where New York State's capital city, Albany, now stands. The Dutch established New Amsterdam in , which was granted self-government in under Peter Stuyvesant. Again even here the clientele seem to take no pride in the history of horse racing.

Read more. Date of experience: April Helpful Share. Kuvasz15 wrote a review Nov Saint Paul, Minnesota contributions helpful votes. This Place Is A Dump. The building is old and run down. The bathrooms are dirty. The track is difficult to get to and parking is a problem. Date of experience: November Long Island, New York 10, contributions 41, helpful votes. Not as nice as Belmont or Saratoga but always a great time. I'm more into harness racing and prefer the Meadowlands.

Date of experience: October Great Racetrack. I've always been a fan of horse racing. This is one of the old racetracks of this region. The seating in the stands is great. Just like Yonkers, you are in the front of the action. Date of experience: May BlueGold75 wrote a review Mar Northampton, Massachusetts 37 contributions 16 helpful votes. Saratoga It Isn't. I'm a horse racing fan and despite the fact I live a few hours from "The Big A", I never made it there until today. For a casual fan, it very likely would do nothing to turn them on to horse racing or keep them there for very long.

For someone who is a horse racing fan, or enjoys a day at the races, they might be able to put up with it for an afternoon. The racing part of the facility has three floors. The first floor has pidgeons flying around it, and signs not to feed them. Did I mention this is a completely enclosed building in the middle of winter? As you get closer to the doors leading to the race track, the smell of weed was pretty evident. I saw one person going through a garbage can looking for possible winning tickets that might have been thrown away by mistake, usually a no-no at most tracks.

I saw people drinking out of paper bags more than once. If you don't feel like braving the cold to watch the horses being saddled, you can watch through some rather grimy, dirty windows overlooking the paddock. The 2nd floor leads to some outdoor seating if the weather lends itself to it. The 3rd floor seemed a little nicer and less crowded than the rest of the joint. It's clear they've tried to spruce the place up. There's a relatively fresh coat of paint and some murals on the walls.

The place didn't seem unsafe as nobody bothered me during the time I was there. If the weather is decent, it's not too hard to get down to the rail to watch the races up close. The food options in the racing portion of the building were limited. There was one concession stand on the first floor that had burgers, dogs and things like that.

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